Concern grows for Norway wage difference / News / The Foreigner

Concern grows for Norway wage difference. Increasing pay gaps in Norway could lead to enhanced social problems, experts and unions fear. Last year’s average annual wage for oil and gas industry employees was 688,000 kroner. Hotel and restaurant sector personnel earned 313,000, according to Statistics Norway (SSB). Norway’s top one percent of earners increased their salaries in 2010, and pay differences in Q1 2011 have not been as high for 80 years.

norwegianpaydifferences, salariesnorway



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Concern grows for Norway wage difference

Published on Wednesday, 23rd November, 2011 at 16:06 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Increasing pay gaps in Norway could lead to enhanced social problems, experts and unions fear.

Handful of kroner
Handful of kroner
Photo: aslakr/Flickr


Last year’s average annual wage for oil and gas industry employees was 688,000 kroner. Hotel and restaurant sector personnel earned 313,000, according to Statistics Norway (SSB).

Norway’s top one percent of earners increased their salaries in 2010, and pay differences in Q1 2011 have not been as high for 80 years.

University of Oslo Professor of Economics Steinar Holden wonders, “Whether pay differences have now not become too large.”

“This could clearly have negative effects. It will lead to major imbalances that could, in themselves, involve considerable social problems for those left behind, income-wise,” he says to NRK.

Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg has already expressed concerns European debt worries and conditions were beginning to mirror those of the 1930s.

Sharing Professor Holden’s disquiet is Øystein Hansen, leader for the Confederation of Norwegian Trade Unions (LO) in Rogaland.

“Increased wage differences lead to social unrest, crime, and other negative things,” he says.

Whilst retail trade workers have been the losers, with 16 percent pay rises over the last six years, employees within the financial sector have experience increases of 40 percent in the same period. They lead the pay scales, together with their oil, gas, and power supply colleagues.

“An important hypothesis is that this goes hand in hand with technological developments. A lot points towards that those who are most productive or highly paid have received the lion’s share because of this,” says Professor Holden.



Published on Wednesday, 23rd November, 2011 at 16:06 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwegianpaydifferences, salariesnorway.





  
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