Conservatives support EU Data Retention Directive / News / The Foreigner

Conservatives support EU Data Retention Directive. Adopting the Data Retention Directive into Norwegian legislation moved closer yesterday after key Party MPs voted in favour of the move. The much-protested DRD will allow security authorities to inspect stored data and communications traffic for a period of up to two years. Almost every Party says it fears a substantial weakening of personal privacy. Socialist Left (SV) politician Hallgeir Langeland, told The Foreigner he believes the DRD will make everyone appear guilty until proven innocent.

dataretentiondirective, conservativeparty, socialistleftparty, hallgeirlangeland, henrikasheim



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Conservatives support EU Data Retention Directive

Published on Thursday, 10th March, 2011 at 17:21 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Adopting the Data Retention Directive into Norwegian legislation moved closer yesterday after key Party MPs voted in favour of the move.

Dedicated servers
Dedicated servers
Photo: Michal Maros/Wikimedia Commons


Scandal

The much-protested DRD will allow security authorities to inspect stored data and communications traffic for a period of up to two years.

Almost every Party says it fears a substantial weakening of personal privacy. Socialist Left (SV) politician Hallgeir Langeland, told The Foreigner he believes the DRD will make everyone appear guilty until proven innocent.

“The core issue is whether we can accept legislating surveillance of every citizen “just in case” someone commits a crime.”

Henrik Asheim, leader of the Young Conservatives, says he fears the information could easily be misused.

“Firstly, the DRD is based on that the information will never leak out, and I think we have adequate examples of public scandals where it has,” he tells NRK.

The police and Labour Party (Ap) politicians have so far been the only advocates of the controversial directive, arguing it will make Norway less susceptible to terror and organised crime.

Litigation

Labour needs the support of the Conservatives to push legislation through in Parliament, with the ballot due next month. The Conservatives voted in favour of the DRD yesterday, saying traffic should only be stored for a maximum of six months and wishing to negotiate with Labour.

This may mean the DRD looks to be more of a reality, but things are still uncertain. The expected 05 April Parliamentary referendum needs 10 Conservative votes to pass, and 11 Party representatives voted against yesterday evening’s resolution. The DRD will not become law if these people are freed from voting.

The possibility of a legal challenge also remains if there is a Parliamentary majority in favour of the directive.

Anders Brenna, head of Norwegian organisation ‘Stopp Datalagringsdirektivet’ (stop the DRD), believes legislation will be overturned by a court for personal privacy reasons.

“It is not a run race, even though I think this is a sad day,” he says.




Published on Thursday, 10th March, 2011 at 17:21 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: dataretentiondirective, conservativeparty, socialistleftparty, hallgeirlangeland, henrikasheim.





  
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