‘Cook frozen berries,’ Nordic health authorities say / News / The Foreigner

‘Cook frozen berries,’ Nordic health authorities say. Several reports of Hepatitis A lead Nordic food safety experts to recommend people cook frozen berries. The warning is issued after epidemiological investigations in Denmark point towards it as being from the same source. Most of the Nordic incidents are reported to be there. Health authorities also say Norway, Sweden, and Finland “have noted more occurrences than usual” amongst those who have not been abroad in the weeks before they became ill.

hepatitisanordics, frozenberries, norwayhealth



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‘Cook frozen berries,’ Nordic health authorities say

Published on Monday, 15th April, 2013 at 16:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Several reports of Hepatitis A lead Nordic food safety experts to recommend people cook frozen berries.

Several strawberries
Several strawberries
Photo: Marcus Vegas/Wikimedia Commons


The warning is issued after epidemiological investigations in Denmark point towards it as being from the same source. Most of the Nordic incidents are reported to be there.

Health authorities also say Norway, Sweden, and Finland “have noted more occurrences than usual” amongst those who have not been abroad in the weeks before they became ill.

Patients in Sweden and Finland have shown to have been infected with the same virus as in Denmark.

According to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (FHI), they have received reports of 14 domestic cases of Hepatitis A – an infectious liver disease – since October 2012.

They underline, however, that just one of the cases here has shown the virus to be the same as in Denmark.

Moreover, their preliminary investigative results “provide no evidence of a common source of infection in patients in Norway.”

“Analyses of virus from patients show that the viruses are of several different types,” FHI officials say.

They are cooperating on the investigation with Food Safety Authority, other countries’ authorities, as well as the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control to see if there are any common denominators for affected patients in these four Nordic countries.

Hepatitis A is a virus which can cause inflammation of the liver. Patients normally recover fully without any liver damage, according to the FHI.

Its symptoms are a temperature, nausea, vomiting, stomach pains, jaundice, dark-coloured urine, and light-coloured stools.

These normally last from between one to several weeks in adults before they rid themselves of the infection and become immune.

Children’s symptoms can be milder, and all patients who exhibit Hepatitis A symptoms are strongly-advised to contact their doctor.

“The most important measure to prevent transmission to others is good hand hygiene after using the toilet and before eating or preparing food,” the FHI says.



Published on Monday, 15th April, 2013 at 16:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: hepatitisanordics, frozenberries, norwayhealth.





  
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