Daring Dane takes to the Bergen festival stage / News / The Foreigner

Daring Dane takes to the Bergen festival stage. Art and music have been the first ever mediums of expression for humans over the centuries, even before language. The very essence of the Bergen International Festival 2013 is to express and address issues through these mediums, its new director, Dane Anders Beyer tells The Foreigner. His creativity trident is preparing to storm Bergen with some exceptional work revolving around the themes water, journey and women. Sharing his insight and future plans for the festival, he lists some of his responsibilities of his new post.

bergeninternationalfestival, artsfestivalbergen



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Daring Dane takes to the Bergen festival stage

Published on Friday, 22nd February, 2013 at 06:32 under the news category, by Shruti Singh.
Last Updated on 22nd February 2013 at 07:08.

Art and music have been the first ever mediums of expression for humans over the centuries, even before language. The very essence of the Bergen International Festival 2013 is to express and address issues through these mediums, its new director, Dane Anders Beyer tells The Foreigner.

Anders Beyer
Anders Beyer
Photo: Ole Christiansen/Bergen Festival


His creativity trident is preparing to storm Bergen with some exceptional work revolving around the themes water, journey and women.

Sharing his insight and future plans for the festival, he lists some of his responsibilities of his new post.

“I’m expected to be the face of the festival, the representative. I have to manage it and ensure the smooth running of the show, even though all the effort is put in by my staff and colleagues,” says Mr Beyer.

“Also, I’m working with geniuses, great artistic minds, and there tend to be showdowns, mood swings and disagreements. I need to know how to deal with all types of personalities in my capacity, give them room and listen to them, as long as I have the last word,” he adds, smiling.

Bergen is far from being a Norwegian backwater, of course. Apart from the festival, many different nationalities grace the city with their presence.

The famous ‘Hurtigruten’ cruise ships depart from here on their journey northwards.

Nevertheless, The Foreigner wondered how Mr Beyer, as a foreigner himself, ended up becoming festival director.

“First of all, I had no idea I’d be chosen,” he remarks. “It’s probably due to the fact that I’ve created a space for myself in the arts and culture field over the years.

“Apart from the professional achievements, I believe it’s my willingness to indulge in constant innovation, collaborate across cultural divides and genres; trying to include new audiences into these festivals that made me a more popular choice for this post.

What would you say are the most important innovations?

“In 2006, I was appointed the artistic director of Athelas Sinfonietta Copenhagen, with them growing to be recognised as one of the main ensembles ones for contemporary music in Europe during my tenure with them,” he explained.

Anders Beyer then went on to discuss his initiating the Athelas New Music

Festival and founding the Copenhagen Opera House, both of which happened three years after his Athelas job.

“The festival’s become one of the most recognised and prominent cultural spaces for contemporary music.”

Talking of the essence of the 61-year-old Bergen International Festival, the oldest one in Norway, he explained “it stands for energy, life and ‘livsglede’ or joy of life.”

“It’s considered a crown jewel of Norwegian culture. I was initially unaware of the impact this festival had on the people of Bergen. It evokes strong sentiments.”

So what about this year?

“We’re celebrating the cultural diversity in the form of a Fargefest (colour fest), where children from all cultural backgrounds will be performing. We have artists from different parts of the world, for example, Cirque Èlioze from Canada,” he says.

“We’ve included many artists from China in our opening opera Tan Dunn’s ‘Marco Polo’. The choreographer for dance company Carte Blanche’s new production is from Tibet.  We even have a co-operation with New York’s Julliard School of Music.”

Bergen’s inhabitants are not like those of other cities in Norway, according to him, highlighting their enthusiasm as one noticeable characteristic.

What would you like to achieve with this and future years’ festivals?

“I’m looking to stir curiosity in hearts, at the same time ensure the audience enjoys this event. However, I’ve added a new flavour to the festival. This year’s festival is a dramatic change from preceding years. I want to push the buttons of my audience. Like I said, you have to take risks if you want to make an impact.”

This year’s May 22 to June 5 Bergen International Festival programme can be found here.



Published on Friday, 22nd February, 2013 at 06:32 under the news category, by Shruti Singh.
Last updated on 22nd February 2013 at 07:08.

This post has the following tags: bergeninternationalfestival, artsfestivalbergen.





  
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