Denmark refugee legislation criticised / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Denmark refugee legislation criticised. Family reunification rules, social welfare levels, and racist hate speech prevalence are worthy of censure, according to the latest ECRI report. The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance, an independent human rights organisation founded by the Council of Europe (COE), criticises Denmark’s new rules for family reunification for beneficiaries of subsidiary protection. These go against ECRI’s former recommendation. It advised that this was a matter of priority rather than a wide ranging re-form.

refugees, asylumseekers, welfare, immigration, migration, paywall



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14:48:46 — Saturday, 21st October, 2017

News Article

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Denmark refugee legislation criticised

Published on Tuesday, 23rd May, 2017 at 21:14 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan and Michael Sandelson   .

Family reunification rules, social welfare levels, and racist hate speech prevalence are worthy of censure, according to the latest ECRI report.



The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance, an independent human rights organisation founded by the Council of Europe (COE), criticises Denmark’s new rules for family reunification for beneficiaries of subsidiary protection.

These go against ECRI’s former recommendation. It advised that this was a matter of priority rather than a wide ranging re-form.

The body’s censure also includes the Nordic country’s decision to impose an extension to three years of the normal waiting period before a family can be reunited.

“Tightening rules for family reunification increases the danger of minors being separated from their families for indefinite periods of time and makes them more vulnerable to trafficking and sexual abuse,” said Council of Europe Secretary General Thorbjørn Jagland.

The migration crisis has seen the number of asylum applications rise in the five Nordic countries. Denmark had 14,680 in 2014 and 20,935 the following year.

The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance’s latest report, which follows the original one from September 2016, mentions criticism of Denmark’s rules regarding welfare.

“Danish authorities also introduced, again, a reduced level of social welfare benefits for some groups of newly-arrived persons, including refugees and beneficiaries of subsidiary protection. ECRI had criticised a similar scheme of differential social welfare standards in the past,” it is stated.

Concerns that the amount is too low to improve integration of recipients into Danish society were reiterated.

Hate speech against Muslims is also mentioned as an area of concern in ECRI’s report. Data collection for hate crime incidents also needs to be improved.

“Combatting racist hate speech is of utmost importance to ensure that the human dignity of everyone is fully respected.” said ECRI’s Chair, Christian Ahlund.

A number of recommendations are made in the report. Two are to be “implemented on a priority basis.” They will be the subject of an interim ECRI follow-up within two years.”

These are:    

  • A comprehensive data collection system for racist and homo-/transphobic hate speech incidents should be set up, with fully disaggregated data by category of offence, type of hate motivation, target group, as well as judicial follow-up and outcome. The authorities should also take measures to tackle under-reporting of hate speech.
  • Ethnic segregation in the Langkaer School in Aarhus should be ended as a matter of urgency and measures taken to prevent any such practices in Danish schools in the future.

The Upper Secondary school was criticised for its move limiting the number of pupils from ethnic minorities in certain classes.

In a similar move in 2011, Norway’s Oslo-located Bjerke Upper Secondary School also was lambasted for its policy of separating its classes by ethnicity.

At the same time, the Council of Europe’s anti-racism body has recognised Denmark’s efforts.

These have taken some steps to increase diversity in policing by employing more members of ethnic minorities as officers.

Denmark’s efforts of Denmark towards addressing the marginalisation of Greenlandic Inuit community that lives there are acknowledged as well.

The results of the report by the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance are based on testimonial evidence, stated ECRI.        




Published on Tuesday, 23rd May, 2017 at 21:14 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: refugees, asylumseekers, welfare, immigration, migration, paywall.



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