Dental scientists find an end to drillings and fillings / News / The Foreigner

Dental scientists find an end to drillings and fillings. King’s College London researchers develop a new method where teeth can repair themselves. This could alleviate Norwegian and other patients’ fear of dentists. Standard procedures involve dentists using a drill and and filling the tooth cavity with amalgam or composite resin. The UK-based researchers’ Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralization (EAER) process helps the teeth to repair themselves in two steps.

dentists, pain, fear, fillings, drill



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Dental scientists find an end to drillings and fillings

Published on Tuesday, 17th June, 2014 at 16:43 under the news category, by Sarah Winkelmann and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 17th June 2014 at 22:50.

King’s College London researchers develop a new method where teeth can repair themselves. This could alleviate Norwegian and other patients’ fear of dentists.

A modern dentist's chair
The new treatment may alleviate patients' anxiety when visiting the dentist.A modern dentist's chair
Photo: Gelmini/Wikimedia Commons


Standard procedures involve dentists using a drill and and filling the tooth cavity with amalgam or composite resin.

The UK-based researchers’ Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralization (EAER) process helps the teeth to repair themselves in two steps.

First, damage to the enamel is repaired, and then an electrical current is used to accelerate the movement of calcium and phosphate minerals into the tooth, reports The Guardian.

Professor Nigel Pitts from King’s College thinks that today’s treatment is a vicious circle, as the process has to be repeated time and time again once one has started filling the tooth.

Listing the advantages of the new method, he tells the paper that “not only is our device kinder to the patient and better for their teeth, but it's expected to be at least as cost-effective as current dental treatments.

“Along with fighting tooth decay, our device can also be used to whiten teeth,” he adds.

It is believed the new Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralization process will be available within three years.

Den norske tannlegeforening’s (Norwegian Dentists' Association) Director of Communications Morten Rolstad says he is unfamiliar with the method.

The EAER discovery also comes following US government researchers’ development of a process a month ago that may put an end to root canal surgery.

They found that an intense blast of light from a laser activated a chemical in the mouth which activated stem cells into forming new dentine. Dentine is the hard core of the tooth that is subject to rotting.

Professor Tiril Willumsen at the University of Oslo’s Institute of Clinical Dentistry expresses some reservations.

“I’ve worked in this field for years. We’re always told at dentistry fairs that something new is coming,” she tells The Foreigner. “I’ll need to see some more documentation to believe it.”

She adds that this will then show whether new methods are good ideas, and recommends current practicing dentists focus on the present.

“In the meantime, good anesthesiology techniques should be employed and pain management worked on.”



Published on Tuesday, 17th June, 2014 at 16:43 under the news category, by Sarah Winkelmann and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 17th June 2014 at 22:50.

This post has the following tags: dentists, pain, fear, fillings, drill.





  
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