Depression among Norwegian adolescents at record level / News / The Foreigner

Depression among Norwegian adolescents at record level. The number of young people taking medication to treat depression has reached an all-time high in Norway. The largest increase by far is among girls aged 15 to 19. Nearly 6,000 young people are currently receiving medication, according to latest Norwegian Prescription Database figures. It was about 4,600 in 2010. University of Oslo senior physician Mette Hvalstad says there are a number of reasons for this increase. She also explains the higher increase among girls.

depression, norway, pills, adolescents, medication, doctors, psychotherapy



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Depression among Norwegian adolescents at record level

Published on Wednesday, 16th July, 2014 at 13:08 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 16th July 2014 at 13:33.

The number of young people taking medication to treat depression has reached an all-time high in Norway. The largest increase by far is among girls aged 15 to 19.

Zoloft bottles (illustration photo)
Adolescents are down in the world's fourth-richest country.Zoloft bottles (illustration photo)
Photo: Ragesoss/Wikimedia Commons


Nearly 6,000 young people are currently receiving medication, according to latest Norwegian Prescription Database figures. It was about 4,600 in 2010.

University of Oslo senior physician Mette Hvalstad says there are a number of reasons for this increase. She also explains the higher increase among girls.

“It’s much more common for young girls to seek help than it is for boys. Another reason is that this is also about pressure from society to succeed,” Ms Hvalstad told NRK.

She thinks that anti-depressants are likely to work better when used alongside other treatments “such as psychotherapy”, however.

At the same time Cecilie Daae, Acting Director of Health at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health believes that little is known about doctors’ referral practices in these situations.

“Medications are important and good when it's right [to prescribe/use them], but it’s clear that this is a public health problem that must be addressed. This worries us”.

In 2011, it was shown that adolescent mental illness prescriptions had increased sharply.

2013’s UN World Happiness Report put Norway in third place, despite more than a million Norwegians using nerve medicine.

National figures for use of anti-depressants among male and female adolescents (15-19-year-olds) are as follows:

  • 2010: 3,037 (F), 1,596 (M) – 4,633 (total)
  • 2011: 3,410 (F), 1,641 (M) – 5,051 (total)
  • 2012: 3,828 (F), 1,795 (M) – 5,623 (total)
  • 2013: 4,064 (F), 1,839 (M) – 5,903 (total)



Published on Wednesday, 16th July, 2014 at 13:08 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 16th July 2014 at 13:33.

This post has the following tags: depression, norway, pills, adolescents, medication, doctors, psychotherapy.





  
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