Digital connectivity surpasses the personal one / News / The Foreigner

Digital connectivity surpasses the personal one. People struggle to survive without technology in the digital age if there is a blackout, surveys show. 68% of some 4,000 people in eight countries Qualcomm surveyed in cooperation with Time said they sleep with their mobile phones beside their bed. Just 13% slept with their phone in a different room. When it came to making it through a power cut, 34% revealed they could last a few hours, whilst only 19% thought they could survive a week without their phone.

online, connectivity, internet, socialmedia



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Digital connectivity surpasses the personal one

Published on Wednesday, 23rd April, 2014 at 14:18 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last Updated on 23rd April 2014 at 14:28.

People struggle to survive without technology in the digital age if there is a blackout, surveys show.

Businessman with his mobile
How long would you survive without this?Businessman with his mobile
Photo: Markus Gann/Shutterstock


68% of some 4,000 people in eight countries Qualcomm surveyed in cooperation with Time said they sleep with their mobile phones beside their bed. Just 13% slept with their phone in a different room.

When it came to making it through a power cut, 34% revealed they could last a few hours, whilst only 19% thought they could survive a week without their phone.

Regarding the internet, company NORDICOM recorded that Norwegians used this for an average of 80% per day, which increased to 85% in 2013.

Time spent online rose from 95 to 112 minutes. This is partly explained by people now reading news publications digitally rather than their printed versions.

52% of the Norwegian population read the newspaper online, against 51% printed.

Social media also scored highly on the ‘I can’t do without my digital world’ scale. January’s research results from Statistic Brain showed that 98% of 18-24 year olds use social media.

The total amount of minutes spent on Facebook per month was 700 billion, with the average individual spending 15 hours and 33 minutes on the social site a month.

Twitter users posted 190 million tweets per day. And while technology is advanced in Norway, Israel ranked highest for the top engaged country for social networking.

This was 11.1 average hours per month in the Middle Eastern country, whilst the US results showed an average of 7.6 hours per month.

People becoming so accustomed to life being online also means they struggle to take a holiday, or enjoy simple activities without any internet connectivity too.

A survey from Ask Your Target Market showed that 43% of the respondents said they go online whilst on a holiday – for example to check email.

Moreover, 18% used the internet whilst out to dinner, and 18% of those surveyed used the internet whilst at a party.

14% would go online even whilst playing host to guests, while 10% could not even escape the internet whilst going to the cinema, according to the research.



Published on Wednesday, 23rd April, 2014 at 14:18 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock.
Last updated on 23rd April 2014 at 14:28.

This post has the following tags: online, connectivity, internet, socialmedia.





  
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