Duty-free system to be spirited away / News / The Foreigner

Duty-free system to be spirited away. Sunday morning will see stricter controls on who buys how much duty-free in place at all Norwegian airports. The Norwegian State has decided to try to stop what they call the “smuggling” of alcohol upon returning to this country. According to the Norwegian Telegram Bureau (NTB), the paper ticket’s demise has meant passengers have been able to obtain a double-quota, as proof of travel is now electronic instead. This means that one passenger can use an email, mobile, boarding card, and seat-number receipt when buying duty-free; something that means that they can return to the same shop several times. Putting a cork in it This is a practice that Customs wish to stop. Each passenger will now receive a stamp on his or her right hand, and something that is only visible under ultra-violet light, according to Aftenposten.

travel, duty-free, airport, alcohol, norwegian, state



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Duty-free system to be spirited away

Published on Tuesday, 24th February, 2009 at 23:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Sunday morning will see stricter controls on who buys how much duty-free in place at all Norwegian airports.

Duty-free sign
Duty-free sign
Photo: Resonants/IStockphoto


Crack-down

The Norwegian State has decided to try to stop what they call the “smuggling” of alcohol upon returning to this country. According to the Norwegian Telegram Bureau (NTB), the paper ticket’s demise has meant passengers have been able to obtain a double-quota, as proof of travel is now electronic instead. This means that one passenger can use an email, mobile, boarding card, and seat-number receipt when buying duty-free; something that means that they can return to the same shop several times.

Putting a cork in it

This is a practice that Customs wish to stop. Each passenger will now receive a stamp on his or her right hand, and something that is only visible under ultra-violet light, according to Aftenposten.

“We have looked at several possibilities, amongst others introducing fingerprints…but after a combined assessment, we have chosen to introduce the stamp, something which we see as being the simplest and most practical solution”, says Morten Evjen, the head of Travel Retail Norway. His company is responsible for most of the duty-free shopping at Norwegian airports.

What are the allowances?

Should there be any doubt in your mind, here is a list for reference.

Alcohol:

1 litre of spirits and 1½ bottles of wine and 2 litres of beer

or

3 litres of wine and 2 litres of beer

or

5 litres of beer.

In order to bring in alcohol, you must be over 18. If the alcoholic content is more than 22 percent by volume, you must be over 20.

Tobacco:

200 cigarettes, or 200 grams of other types of tobacco products, and 200 leaves of cigarette paper.

In order to bring in tobacco products, you must also be over 18.

Cheers.



Published on Tuesday, 24th February, 2009 at 23:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: travel, duty-free, airport, alcohol, norwegian, state.





  
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