East Norway priest raises flag to show gay rights support / News / The Foreigner

East Norway priest raises flag to show gay rights support. Nord-Odal municipality’s Thomas Tinglum hoisted a rainbow flag outside his church in support of gays. The clergyman, based in the county of Hedmark, made his decision to raise the flag in connection with the end of the Sochi Olympics, Sunday. He is worried about what will happen to those living in Russia where laws banning homosexual propaganda are in place

gaysnorway, gayrights



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East Norway priest raises flag to show gay rights support

Published on Wednesday, 26th February, 2014 at 15:24 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 26th February 2014 at 15:46.

Nord-Odal municipality’s Thomas Tinglum hoisted a rainbow flag outside his church in support of gays.

Rainbow flag and blue skies
The flag could be seen outside the church.Rainbow flag and blue skies
Photo: Ludovic Bertrand/Wikimedia Commons


The clergyman, based in the county of Hedmark, made his decision to raise the flag in connection with the end of the Sochi Olympics, Sunday.

He is worried about what will happen to those living in Russia where laws banning homosexual propaganda are in place

“It causes me pain [knowing] that people could be lynched on the street because of their sexual orientation,” he told NRK. “It’s not only about the gay issue for me, but also about human dignity, everyone should have their rights. The rainbow symbolises diversity and equality.”

Moreover, while same-gender marriages in Norway are legal under civil ceremonies, the Church has yet to decide on this issue for religious weddings. The Church Council is to decide this in April this year.

This week has seen Norway suspend some NOK 50m (about USD 8.25m/EUR 6.01m/GBP 4.95m) aid contributions to Uganda after President Yoweri Museveni signed an anti-homosexual bill this week.

“Norway deeply regrets the signing of a new and more stringent anti-gay bill by Uganda’s President today. The new law violates fundamental human rights and the Ugandan constitution. It will exacerbate the situation for an already vulnerable group, and criminalises individuals and organisations working to promote the rights of sexual minorities,” Foreign Minister Børge Brende said in a statement.

He also vowed to “increase our support to human rights and democracy defenders.”

At the same time, state-owned broadcaster NRK reported, Wednesday, that Norway gives some NOK 4bn (roughly USD 660.26m/EUR 481.38m/GBP 396.14m at today’s ROE) to 31 African countries with a ban on homosexuality.

These include Algeria, Botswana, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, and Zambia, the broadcaster reports NORAD’s (Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation) overview as stating.




Published on Wednesday, 26th February, 2014 at 15:24 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 26th February 2014 at 15:46.

This post has the following tags: gaysnorway, gayrights.





  
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