Economic rights of parents threatened / News / The Foreigner

Economic rights of parents threatened. Politicians are looking to reform the system of social benefit payouts to parents of newborn children in Norway next year. 12 years ago, the government introduced benefit payments for parents who elected to be with their children for up to two further years after the child turned one, instead of going back to work. The present maximum monthly payment of 3,500 kroner is tax free, but do not replace what the parent would have earned if they worked, and let somebody else look after the child instead. The system is now under review by the government. Therefore, this promises to be one of the major issues that this election is fought on, especially because the Christian Democrats (KrF), who were in government at the time of the system’s inception, now wish to increase the payments. “It’s important for those who choose to have children to have a comfortable economic situation”, Dagfinn Høybråten, KrF’s party leader told Bergens Tidende (bt.no). Scrapped

children, kindergarten, parents, benefit, payments, disorders, bonding



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Economic rights of parents threatened

Published on Thursday, 5th March, 2009 at 22:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Politicians are looking to reform the system of social benefit payouts to parents of newborn children in Norway next year.

A group of toddlers
A group of toddlers
Photo: Andrejs Pidjass/Shutterstock photos


Stay-at-home parents to lose out

12 years ago, the government introduced benefit payments for parents who elected to be with their children for up to two further years after the child turned one, instead of going back to work. The present maximum monthly payment of 3,500 kroner is tax free, but do not replace what the parent would have earned if they worked, and let somebody else look after the child instead. The system is now under review by the government. Therefore, this promises to be one of the major issues that this election is fought on, especially because the Christian Democrats (KrF), who were in government at the time of the system’s inception, now wish to increase the payments.

“It’s important for those who choose to have children to have a comfortable economic situation”, Dagfinn Høybråten, KrF’s party leader told Bergens Tidende (bt.no).

Scrapped

The Labour party (Ap) have said that because they have built enough kindergartens, so that every child in the country now has a guaranteed place. They argue, therefore, that this removes the need for the system, and wish to remove it from next year’s budget entirely. The Socialist Left party (SV), who are part of the Red-Green coalition, have always been one of the most fervent critics of the system. But its removal is not guaranteed. The coalition’s third party, the Centre (SP), is split on whether to remove it, or keep it but in another form.

Aftenposten asked Ap’s Britt Hildeng what she thought would happen to the parents who wished to remain at home after the child’s first birthday.

“They will have to find solutions”, she said.

Disagreement

To compound the issue further, Professor Lars Smith, an expert in child psychology in the Psychology faculty at Oslo University, believes, according to Aftenposten, that the bond that children form with their parents from when they are six months is decisive in its development. If they go to kindergarten too early, it can cause psychological damage.

“Disorganised bonding is often the cause of ADD, eating disorders, various depressive conditions, and personality-disorders” he told the newspaper.

Britt Hildeng does not concur with the expert.

"There is always someone who wishes to raise this type of argument, but there is a lot of research that both contradicts and questions this type of research. I believe that one year-olds are fine in kindergarten…so I’m taking this with a large pinch of salt."



Published on Thursday, 5th March, 2009 at 22:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: children, kindergarten, parents, benefit, payments, disorders, bonding.





  
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