Electric vehicle CO2 emissions should be reduced, researchers say / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Electric vehicle CO2 emissions should be reduced, researchers say. Nearly half of EVs’ CO2 emissions come from battery production. There are now calls to use Norwegian hydropower instead. Linda Ager-Wick Ellingsen, a Fellow in Industrial Ecology at Norway’s University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, has authored a report into the production of the lithium-ion batteries used in electric cars. “The batteries are manufactured largely in China, Japan and South Korea. These are countries that have a different energy mix than what we are used to in Norway. China uses a lot of coal-fired power,” she told Aftenposten this week.

electriccars, co2, norway, climate, emissions, globalwarming



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Electric vehicle CO2 emissions should be reduced, researchers say

Published on Thursday, 24th July, 2014 at 22:01 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 10th August 2014 at 00:49.

Nearly half of EVs’ CO2 emissions come from battery production. There are now calls to use Norwegian hydropower instead.



Linda Ager-Wick Ellingsen, a Fellow in Industrial Ecology at Norway’s University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, has authored a report into the production of the lithium-ion batteries used in electric cars.

“The batteries are manufactured largely in China, Japan and South Korea. These are countries that have a different energy mix than what we are used to in Norway. China uses a lot of coal-fired power,” she told Aftenposten this week.

Ms Ellingsen believes that it is possible to produce these batteries in Norway. This could result in a 60 per cent drop in emissions.

Grenland Energy’s Lars Ole Valøen believes “Norwegian battery production will also have the potential of being cleaner than similar production elsewhere in the world.”

He was the first to take a PhD in the battery study field, according to the paper. 

At the same time, Sverre Iversen, general manager of Gylling teknikk – the largest supplier of batteries to sectors including hospitals and industry in Norway – believes that creating this industry at home would require “massive investment.”

He also thinks production of batteries is likely to continue in other countries for now.

“Building an industry around this takes many years. We must prepare ourselves for the fact that battery production for cars and ships will mainly take place in China in the foreseeable future and in South Korea, Japan, and the United States to some extent.”

Norway currently has around 29,000 electric vehicles on the road. This makes up about five per cent of the world’s electric cars.

20 per cent of new car sales in Norway were electric vehicles in March 2014.




Published on Thursday, 24th July, 2014 at 22:01 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 10th August 2014 at 00:49.

This post has the following tags: electriccars, co2, norway, climate, emissions, globalwarming.





  
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