EU unpopular Left, Right, and Centre / News / The Foreigner

EU unpopular Left, Right, and Centre. Norway Communists the Red Party (Rødt), Centre Party (Sp), and Rightists Progress (FrP) unite on the issue of being EU sceptics. Almost 70 per cent of Progress MPs declare they are anti EU membership and will make this heard should they get into power, Nationen reports a No to the EU lobby survey as revealing. This is up some 26 per cent from today’s FrP parliamentary gathering. 19 of 30 power-holding hopefuls say they would like increased exercise of Norway’s EEA agreement right of reservation clause. At the same time, 13 prefer this deal to a bilateral trade agreement, according to the poll.

norwayeu, eumembershipnorway



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EU unpopular Left, Right, and Centre

Published on Monday, 19th August, 2013 at 19:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norway Communists the Red Party (Rødt), Centre Party (Sp), and Rightists Progress (FrP) unite on the issue of being EU sceptics.

EU sign
EU sign
Photo: Uggboy, Ugggirl/Flickr


Almost 70 per cent of Progress MPs declare they are anti EU membership and will make this heard should they get into power, Nationen reports a No to the EU lobby survey as revealing. This is up some 26 per cent from today’s FrP parliamentary gathering.

19 of 30 power-holding hopefuls say they would like increased exercise of Norway’s EEA agreement right of reservation clause. At the same time, 13 prefer this deal to a bilateral trade agreement, according to the poll.

Progress Party leader Siv Jensen vows to pose the EU high-standard and critical questions, deputy Per Sandberg promises they are “going to be more critical of the EU-origin Directives, laws and, frameworks.”

“We’re clear on that the [EEA] agreement must be renegotiated and in the worst case be given the elbow if getting room for negotiation and ensuring national sovereignty within it isn’t possible,” he added.

Mr Sandberg voted in favour of Norwegian EU membership at the last national referendum in 1994, changing his ways when he became an MP in 1997.

He remarked to Nationen last week this was when he “gained insight into what power the EU had to remove national sovereignty.” The Party says it will “respect the people’s will regarding EU membership for Norway via a national referendum”.

Moreover, Østfold County FrP branch also supports examining whether Norway is still served by being Schengen members.

Centre’s (Sp) Deputy Agriculture and Food Minister, Erlend Grimstad, thinks he will believe FrP putting their EU foot down when he sees it.

“What he says is not very credible given that the Party has been supporters of exactly the agreements they are now regretting the effects of,” he declared.

Moreover, Centrist Politicians say they would like to revert to Norway’s pre-EEA Agreement bilateral trade deal and review the country’s membership of Schengen.

Moving to the extreme Left, Red Party leader Bjørnar Moxnes would rather Norway got out of the EEA Agreement.

“It’s an agreement in a class of its own. There are no other trade agreements whereby one party must adopt all rules that the other party chooses to introduce themselves. The EU binds us to a market liberalism that promotes privatisation and threatens the Norwegian model,” he told business website E24.no.

Mr Moxnes calls the EU’s threat of trade barriers if Norway pulls out of the EEA Agreement “empty”.

“The free trade agreement of 1973 ensures duty-free access for industrial goods to the EU. Since then, we have joined the WTO (World Trade Organisation) which prohibits barriers to trade between the blocks,” he declared.

“Both [the EU and Norway] have interests in trade with one other as long as the EU needs oil, gas, and fish, and we need to import goods.”



Published on Monday, 19th August, 2013 at 19:57 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayeu, eumembershipnorway.





  
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