Europe anti-trafficking gets a boost / News / The Foreigner

Europe anti-trafficking gets a boost. The Council of Europe’s new guide is published to give national authorities a compendium to follow. Its Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA) released it to mark this month’s 10th European Anti-Trafficking Day. The guide consists of many examples of well-established procedures from other countries, including five practices from Norway.

humantrafficking, sex, sale, buy, prostitutes, children, paywall



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Europe anti-trafficking gets a boost

Published on Wednesday, 26th October, 2016 at 15:27 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan.

The Council of Europe’s new guide is published to give national authorities a compendium to follow.

Human Trafficking
"Human trafficking is a modern-day scourge," declares Norway's Thorbjørn Jagland.Human Trafficking
Photo: flyingorcas/Flickr


Its Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA) released it to mark this month’s 10th European Anti-Trafficking Day.

The guide consists of many examples of well-established procedures from other countries, including five practices from Norway.

These include:

  • Information campaigns at airports targeted at young men conducted in 2013. These were to dissuade them from buying sex for the first time in a foreign country as well as criminalising purchases of sex – Norwegian legislation from 2008 allows sex to be sold but not bought
  • A programme based on the International Organization for Migration (IOM) incentive to provide previous people who have been trafficked the tools to integrate back in to their society in order to avoid being re-trafficked
  • A training programme based on the research by the Fafo Institute for Labour and Social Research (2013). This is for those who are working at reception centres for asylum seekers and social welfare officers who are likely to come in contact with child victims
  • A six-month reflection period for victims of human trafficking which provides them with residence cards, healthcare, accommodation, and other aids

GRETA’s guidebook includes procedures from over 50 different evaluations from many countries that the group has published reports on.

These have been released since the Council of Europe’s (COE) Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings came into force in 2008.

The first evaluation round regarding Norway was conducted between 2010 and 2013.

“Human trafficking is a modern-day scourge, but over the last few years our member states have taken many really important steps to help prevent trafficking, to protect victims and to prosecute offenders,” said Norway’s Thorbjørn Jagland, Secretary General of CEO in a statement.

GRETA is responsible for implementing the COE’s anti-trafficking convention. 46 of the Council’s 47 member states – which include Russia – are signatories.

The full guide can be read here (external link).




Published on Wednesday, 26th October, 2016 at 15:27 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan.

This post has the following tags: humantrafficking, sex, sale, buy, prostitutes, children, paywall.





  
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