Excess caffeine may decrease birth weight / News / The Foreigner

Excess caffeine may decrease birth weight. Women with a high caffeine intake puts the newborns at a greater risk of low birth weight without shortening pregnancies, a recent Scandinavian study shows. Moreover, whilst it is known that smoking also affects the baby’s weight, a direct link between caffeine consumption and this was also found. The study does not explain why caffeine may inhibit fetal growth. 59,000 women partook in the survey.

norwayhealth, coffeepregnancy



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Excess caffeine may decrease birth weight

Published on Wednesday, 27th February, 2013 at 07:27 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.
Last Updated on 27th February 2013 at 07:52.

Women with a high caffeine intake puts the newborns at a greater risk of low birth weight without shortening pregnancies, a recent Scandinavian study shows.

Fresh coffee being poured in to a cup
Fresh coffee being poured in to a cup
Photo: Lfoto/Shutterstock Images


In the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Mother and Child survey, authorities suggest a daily caffeine intake of no more than equivalent of three cups of coffee is an ideal limit.

All the expectant mothers with a higher-than-recommended limit faced a 27-62% increased risk of smaller babies in relation to term-length.

The fetus loses the equivalent of 21-28 grams per 100 milligrams of caffeine per day for one with an expected average birth weight of around 3.6 kilograms (roughly 7 pounds, 15 ounces).

“Caffeine consumption is strongly correlated with smoking which is known to increase the risk for both preterm delivery and the baby being small for gestational age,” said project leader Dr. Verena Sengpiel from Sweden’s Sahlgrenska Academy.

“In this study we found no association between caffeine intake and preterm delivery but we did find an association between caffeine and babies who were small for gestational age,” she added.

Caffeine, the main source via coffee and tea, is transferred to the fetus as the mother’s body cannot break it down completely. Other sources are soda and chocolate, for example.

Moreover, whilst it is known that smoking also affects the baby’s weight, a direct link between caffeine consumption and this was also found. The study does not explain why caffeine may inhibit fetal growth.

59,000 women partook in the survey.



Published on Wednesday, 27th February, 2013 at 07:27 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.
Last updated on 27th February 2013 at 07:52.

This post has the following tags: norwayhealth, coffeepregnancy.





  
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