Expelled criminals return / News / The Foreigner

Expelled criminals return. Ineffective system creates problems. The number break-ins and aggravated burglaries by mostly foreign criminals have increased by more than a third in the last five years.Ineffective Norwegian police report inadequate measures mean many Lithuanian, Albanian, and Romanian lawbreakers deported after serving time, return to offend again. Property crimes now account for 60 percent of all felonies.

criminals, expelled, jail, deportation, asylum, property, break-in, aggravated, burglary



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Expelled criminals return

Published on Wednesday, 24th March, 2010 at 14:56 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Ineffective system creates problems.

Cell door, Grimstad local police station
Cell door, Grimstad local police station
Photo: Friman/Wikimedia Commons


The number break-ins and aggravated burglaries by mostly foreign criminals have increased by more than a third in the last five years.

Ineffective

Norwegian police report inadequate measures mean many Lithuanian, Albanian, and Romanian lawbreakers deported after serving time, return to offend again. Property crimes now account for 60 percent of all felonies.

“An expulsion from Norway isn’t effective. We deport them and it’s not long before they’re back,” police lawyer Morten Reppen tells NRK.

Geir Ellefesen, head of Oslo police’s intelligence and property crime group, thinks it’s a paradox.

“We see that people who we’ve worked at getting arrested for a long time, who’ve been in custody, been convicted, and deported, come back again. They’re back in Oslo again after one to three weeks, and we arrest them for the same crime once more," he says.

Thumbs-up

To try and combat the problem, Hanne Kristin Rohde – assistant chief constable of Oslo police district – has already proposed locking criminals up in secure custody after they’ve served their time prior to deportation.

Sylo Taraku, the Norwegian Organisation for Asylum Seekers’ (NOAS) acting secretary general, supports her suggestion.

He says several asylum seekers have also protested about what they feel is abuse of the system by a handful of people.

“It damages the victims, all other asylum seekers, and undermines the asylum system. They could be held in secure custody if there are prospects of a relatively speedy return,” he tells Dagsavisen.

Action

Pål Lønseth, Labour’s (Ap) State Secretary at the Department of Justice, believes it would be better if these criminals serve time in their home country after being convicted.

He thinks the law should be changed.

“All countries are legally obliged to accept their own citizens. The problem is determining their identity well enough so compulsory repatriation is possible. We must have rules that allow for deprivation of their liberty.”

The government says it will now be speeding up its efforts to send Eastern European criminals back.



Published on Wednesday, 24th March, 2010 at 14:56 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: criminals, expelled, jail, deportation, asylum, property, break-in, aggravated, burglary.





  
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