Extra-Norway waste keeps capital going / News / The Foreigner

Extra-Norway waste keeps capital going. COMMENTARY: As Rightists enthusiastically continue their debate about banning some allegedly inferior immigrants from a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the Qur’an, Oslo’s district heating system is reliant on foreign rubbish to prevent cold shoulders. The capital’s Waste-to-Energy Agency (EGE) facility needs this to exploit capacity. EGE is importing some 30,000 tons of Northern England litter from Manchester, Leeds, and Bristol this winter. Compressed together with 250,000 tons of Norwegian business and municipality trash, EGE hopes this will help them be victorious in the junk war.

muslimsnorway, norwayintegration



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Extra-Norway waste keeps capital going

Published on Thursday, 3rd January, 2013 at 18:49 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 3rd January 2013 at 19:00.

COMMENTARY: As Rightists enthusiastically continue their debate about banning some allegedly inferior immigrants from a monotheistic Abrahamic religion based on the Qur’an, Oslo’s district heating system is reliant on foreign rubbish to prevent cold shoulders.

Tord Lien MP
Tord Lien MP
Photo: Reynir Johannesson/Frp


The capital’s Waste-to-Energy Agency (EGE) facility needs this to exploit capacity. EGE is importing some 30,000 tons of Northern England litter from Manchester, Leeds, and Bristol this winter.

Compressed together with 250,000 tons of Norwegian business and municipality trash, EGE hopes this will help them be victorious in the junk war.

“It’s a free market where the lowest price wins tender offers, regardless of regions and countries,” the company’s Jannicke Gerner Bjerkås tells Aftenposten.

In response to the paper’s question whether EGE is aware of the contents of the British rubbish, she answers that they have analysed it.

Scrutiny both in England and Norway revealed that “it’s ordinary household waste”, says Ms Bjerkås, “they’ve got mechanical sorting where they remove large pieces of plastic, organic waste, metals, glass and hazardous waste. The rest is ground into a ‘ball’ and sent to us.”

Apparently, English litter is considered “less controversial” than southern Europeans the Italians’ waste. EGE also receives remuneration for the British rubbish handling, not Italians, as far as The Foreigner is aware.

Passing its own “ball”, meanwhile, Norway sends its refuse to be handled in Sweden. In line with current Norwegian immigration policy, sending things not wanted out of Norway is efficient and cheaper long-term.

Norwegian trash comes from as far away from the common Scandinavian border as western Norway, as well as Vestfold County and eastern Norway’s Romerike in Akershus County, amongst other places.

Still on foreigner affairs and rubbish, the Progress Party (FrP) is now taking the religious and integrative high ground on the matter of private schools and applications.

Education policy spokesperson Tord Lien defends the Party’s view, pronouncing, “We think that integration must be taken into account when processing these.”

Mr Lien finds the prospect of private Muslim compulsory schools in Norway problematic.

Private Muslim schools are allowed in Sweden, just like Norwegian refuse.

“There are already major integration challenges in Oslo,” he explains, adding the Party is afraid these will only exacerbate the problem. He does not say the same about the Christian equivalent.

Questioned about discrimination, Mr Lien responds arguing that these undermine integration is “difficult”.

“They’ve been around for centuries”, (as have Muslims), “so we’d rather rethink our position on the day integration works better.”

“It’s an advantage to attend school with Norwegian children if you’re going to be integrated into Norwegian society.  Children’s parents telling them we must attend another school because we’re so different will have the opposite effect,” he concludes.

Mr Lien’s first point is somewhat true; his second is sanctimonious poppycock.




Published on Thursday, 3rd January, 2013 at 18:49 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 3rd January 2013 at 19:00.

This post has the following tags: muslimsnorway, norwayintegration.





  
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