Fatal Widerøe plane crash investigation re-opened 25 years later / News / The Foreigner

Fatal Widerøe plane crash investigation re-opened 25 years later. Norwegian air safety officials are to re-start investigations into the 1988 air disaster which killed all 36 aboard the carrier’s domestic route. Widerøe flight 710 hit Torghatten Mountain on 6 May at about 8:30pm whilst on approach to Nordland County’s Brønnøysund Airport. The impact with terrain smashed most of the four-engine de Havilland DHC-7 Dash 7 plane’s fuselage to pieces, whilst the remaining wreckage continued burning.

norwayaircrash, torghattendisaster, wideroe



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Fatal Widerøe plane crash investigation re-opened 25 years later

Published on Monday, 1st July, 2013 at 18:11 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 1st July 2013 at 23:25.

Norwegian air safety officials are to re-start investigations into the 1988 air disaster which killed all 36 aboard the carrier’s domestic route.

Widerøe Dash-7 LN-WFE
This De Havilland Canada DHC-7-100 is a sister aircraft to the one that crashed in 1988, seen here in 1987 at Hammerfest Airport, northern NorwayWiderøe Dash-7 LN-WFE
Photo: Udo K. Haafke/Wikimedia Commons


Widerøe flight 710 hit Torghatten Mountain on 6 May at about 8:30pm whilst on approach to Nordland County’s Brønnøysund Airport.

The impact with terrain smashed most of the four-engine de Havilland DHC-7 Dash 7 plane’s fuselage to pieces, whilst the remaining wreckage continued burning.

Accident investigators at the time concluded the plane, aircraft registration LN-WFN, descended from some 1,600 to 550 feet (about 500 meters to 170 meters) at 8 nautical miles out from the airport instead of 4. They settled on that the crash was due to pilot error.

Meanwhile, retired police officer Arnfinn Grydeland confirmed to NRK last week one passenger had taken a mobile phone on board with them.

Mr Grydeland had disembarked the plane at Namsos, a stop-over before it took off for its final destination following its leg from Trondheim’s Værnes Airport.

According to him, the passenger was apparently seated in the cockpit’s jump-seat slightly behind the middle area between the two pilots. This meant the phone would have been very close to electronic equipment during the flight.

Mr Grydeland had mentioned the mobile phone to staff at the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC) Northern Norway in Bodø after the crash occurred.

JRCC employees had asked him to send them a report about this, which he said he did. He remarked to the broadcaster last week that accident investigators have never called him in about this.

The retired police officer only found out recently that it had not been put in the accident investigators’ final report, however, and asked current Accident Investigation Board (AIBN) officials why.

“I went online and downloaded the now publicly-available main report from the accident in connection with its 25th anniversary. I was mildly surprised when I read the report that they [accident investigators] had not included any of the information I had given. It’s not mentioned in the report at all, and there’s also no evidence that the information I gave was considered,” he said.

NMT 450 network-based mobiles at the time were fitted with a 15-watt transmitter and a powerful battery which could lead to disruption in electronic equipment.

In last week’s NRK article, Johannes Meosli, who worked in Televerket at the time (now Telenor), said there were base stations located in Nordland County’s Vega amd Bindal municipalities.

The plane would have had a free line of sight to the Vega one about 30 kilometres away (some 16 nautical miles).

“It’s not unlikely that the mobile changed base station in the Torghatten area. If it did, it sent out a signal of 15 watts when it left the Bindal one and was connected to the base station at Vega. This happened automatically, without any need to use the phone,” declared Mr Meosli to NRK.

Current Accident Investigation Board (AIBN) officials said last week they have not prioritised checking Arnfinn Grydeland’s information about the 1988 air crash.

Moreover, Joint Rescue Coordination Centre personnel stated they have no record of Mr Grydeland’s report and the AIBN are unaware of whether this was ever handed to their personnel in 1988.

AIBN officials now declare, Monday, they will be reopening the investigation into the accident due to “new factual information” that has come to light.

“The AIBN has been made aware of information that does not appear to have been known when this tragic accident occurred in 1988,” they write in a statement.

“Based on this new information, the AIBN will be investigating whether it can be documented if radiation from mobile phones may have affected the flight. The investigation of the new information will be documented and made public,” officials conclude.




Published on Monday, 1st July, 2013 at 18:11 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 1st July 2013 at 23:25.

This post has the following tags: norwayaircrash, torghattendisaster, wideroe.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!