Finland beats Norway on anti-discrimination, immigration issues / News / The Foreigner

Finland beats Norway on anti-discrimination, immigration issues. The country is better than its Nordic companion in three areas, a new survey shows. Norwegian academics think its scope is too narrow. According to the 2015 edition of MIPEX (Migrant Integration Policy Index), both countries score 69 out of 100 overall. They are ranked joint-fourth in the 38-country survey – just 15 are published to date, with the rest scheduled for release between now and 30th June.

immigration, integration, discrimination, citizenship, report



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Finland beats Norway on anti-discrimination, immigration issues

Published on Thursday, 4th June, 2015 at 15:03 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The country is better than its Nordic companion in three areas, a new survey shows. Norwegian academics think its scope is too narrow.

The flags of the Nordic countries
The flags of the Nordic countries
Photo: Malene Thyssen/Wikimedia Commons


According to the 2015 edition of MIPEX (Migrant Integration Policy Index), both countries score 69 out of 100 overall.

They are ranked joint-fourth in the 38-country survey – just 15 are published to date, with the rest scheduled for release between now and 30th June.

However, Finland is superior to Norway regarding family reunion, anti-discrimination, and access to nationality – EU member Finland allows dual citizenship, EEA member Norway does not. Moreover, becoming a Norwegian national is difficult.

The respective Finland-Norway results for these three areas are 68-63, 77-59, and 63-52.

Finland trails Norway on labour market mobility education, health, and political participation.

These results are 80-90, 60-65, 53-67, and 79-82, respectively. Both Nordic Countries are given 70 apiece regarding permanent residency.

Jan-Paul Brekke PhD, Senior Research Fellow at Norway’s ISF (Institute for Social Research) in Oslo, was present at today’s MIPEX 2015 results presentation.

The event, which was in cooperation with the ISF, was hosted by IMDi (Directorate of Integration and Diversity) at their premises in Tollbugata near Oslo City Hall.

Why did Finland score higher than Norway in these three areas?

“The MIPEX Index looks at the liberal side of the integration regulations and policies framework,” Dr Brekke tells The Foreigner.

ISF Senior Research Fellow Dr Arnfinn H. Midtbøen gave a presentation at today’s gathering. He says that he had two main comments to make about MIPEX’s results.

“The first was their underlying assumption that liberal policies always lead to successful integration of foreigners. MIPEX draws a link between the macro-policy level and lived experiences on the ground. This has not been studied sufficiently, empirically-speaking, and MIPEX should probably be more cautious in their assumptions.”

Dr Midtbøen’s second comment was regarding MIPEX’s selection of immigrant groups.

“The MIPEX report is exclusively about non-EU/EEA citizens in Norway, but almost half of the immigrants currently living here are from the EU/EEA area. MIPEX’s research, which started in 2004 at a time of EU expansion, seems a bit dated,” he remarks.

MIPEX says that Norway uses their results to promote its integration policies abroad. What would you say regarding this matter?

“That may well be the case, but what is important here is if Norway’s policies are successful when it comes to integrating migrants in practice. The MIPEX report does not say much about that,” concludes Dr Midtbøen.

The MIPEX reports are produced by CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs) and MPG (the Migration Policy Group).

Scores are decided by using a combination of 167 indicators, 8 policy areas, and 3 options. It is described as tool to measure policies to integrate migrants in all EU member states, as well as Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, and the US.

The remaining 13 countries’ position and overall score in the currently-released MIPEX 2015 series are:

6. Canada (68)                           
7. Belgium (67)
9. US (63)
13.Italy (59)
17.France (54)
19.Ireland (52)
20.Austria (50)
21.Switzerland (49)
27.Slovenia (44)
30.Croatia (43)
33.Malta (40)
34.Lithuania (37)
34.Slovakia (37)

These are the scheduled release dates for Australia, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Japan, Latvia, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Romania, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, and the UK.

MIPEX’s 2015 report on Norway can be read here.     



Published on Thursday, 4th June, 2015 at 15:03 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: immigration, integration, discrimination, citizenship, report.





  
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