Foreign minister argues case for common Nordic G-20 seat / News / The Foreigner

Foreign minister argues case for common Nordic G-20 seat. Letter to Nordic country colleagues encourages unity. Norway’s foreign minister Jonas Gahr Støre would like to see the Nordic countries have a common seat in the G-20 group.  He has sent a letter to his foreign minister counterparts asking them to debate its viability.Difficult According to Aftenposten, the issue is expected to be one of the matters discussed when all the Nordic ministers meet at the UN’s General Assembly in New York later on this week. Støre believes that unity is important if Norway’s suggestion is to stand any chance.

nordic, countries, g-20, group, membership, eu, foreign, minister, jonas, gahr, stre, un, general, assembly, ny, new, york



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Foreign minister argues case for common Nordic G-20 seat

Published on Monday, 21st September, 2009 at 09:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Letter to Nordic country colleagues encourages unity.

The flags of the Nordic countries
The flags of the Nordic countries
Photo: Malene Thyssen/Wikimedia Commons


Norway’s foreign minister Jonas Gahr Støre would like to see the Nordic countries have a common seat in the G-20 group.  He has sent a letter to his foreign minister counterparts asking them to debate its viability.

Difficult

According to Aftenposten, the issue is expected to be one of the matters discussed when all the Nordic ministers meet at the UN’s General Assembly in New York later on this week. Støre believes that unity is important if Norway’s suggestion is to stand any chance.

“The G-20 isn’t something you join and resign from, according to its membership criteria….I think the Nordic countries will have difficulty being accepted on and individual basis,” he tells the paper.

Irrelevant for the EU

Although three of the Nordic countries -- Sweden, Denmark, and Finland -- are already represented in the group by the EU, Støre doesn’t see this as being an obstacle to getting a seat, should the proposition be accepted.

“Norway greatly respects this, of course, but countries such as Germany, France, Britain, the Netherlands, Spain and Italy have their own seats in the group in addition to being EU members, without it being an issue for the EU itself.”

He does confirm, however, that this has been a topic during informal debates amongst American politicians, and says that the new U.S. administration is concerned with how the G-20 is to function in the future.

Therefore he believes that the time to come with this suggestion is now, before the die has been cast.

A long-shot

Meanwhile, Sweden’s Minister of Finance, Anders Borg, thinks that there is little chance of the initiative succeeding.

“We’ve had constructive conversations with the Norwegians, Danes, and Finns, but one has to look at this realistically. The G-20 countries have little interest in increasing the size of the group, particularly when it comes to incorporating more European countries,” he tells NTB.

Norway is one of the world’s largest exporters of crude oil and the second largest supplier of gas to EU countries. It also has the 23rd largest economy in the world.



Published on Monday, 21st September, 2009 at 09:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: nordic, countries, g-20, group, membership, eu, foreign, minister, jonas, gahr, stre, un, general, assembly, ny, new, york.





  
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