Foreigners find Norwegians aloof / News / The Foreigner

Foreigners find Norwegians aloof. Norwegians are considered cold and feel superior, a recent World Economic Forum study shows. According to the WEF 'Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report 2013', which reveals how welcome tourists feel in countries across the globe, Norway has no mention-worthy ranking. Of the 140 countries that are mentioned, Norway ranked 59th. Its position was close to certain other countries’, such as Kazakhstan, Ethiopia, Burundi and Spain.

tourismnorway, foreignersnorway, coldnorwegians



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Foreigners find Norwegians aloof

Published on Thursday, 21st March, 2013 at 16:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Shruti Chauhan   .
Last Updated on 21st March 2013 at 17:50.

Norwegians are considered cold and feel superior, a recent World Economic Forum study shows.

Norwegian flag over Bergen
Norwegian flag over Bergen
Photo: alex-s/Flickr


According to the WEF 'Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report 2013', which reveals how welcome tourists feel in countries across the globe, Norway has no mention-worthy ranking.

Of the 140 countries that are mentioned, Norway ranked 59th. Its position was close to certain other countries’, such as Kazakhstan, Ethiopia, Burundi and Spain.

And while tourists feel more welcome in places like Uganda, Mexico, Ghana, Estonia and Kenya than in Norway, Icelanders have reason to celebrate.

New Zealand, Morocco, Macedonia and Austria closely follow the Island’s popularity amongst travellers.

“If there’s one thing I’ve noticed in Norway is that Norwegians are not friendly”, writes Emily in her blog this week on regional paper Bergens Tidende, “they [Norwegians] care almost exclusively about themselves and their ‘people’.”

16-year-old Emily, who admits “this is of course not all, but many”, made a detailed account of her stay in Norway these past four years.

A complete stranger to the language, people, and culture, she got down to learning the language to ease her way into society.

One of the questions in the WEF survey was “how welcome are foreign visitors in your country?"

People were then asked to rate their answer on a scale of 1 to 7, where 1 means ‘very unwelcome’, and 7 represents ‘very welcome’.

In its 59th place, Norway received an average of 6.3, top country Iceland 6.8, and Bolivia scored the least with 4.1 in 140th position.

Blogger Emily, who told NRK she found the results “unsurprising”, writes she was extremely surprised at the way people in Norway shy away from strangers.

“Head to the US! Go to the store, take a jog, sit on the bus, I can promise you that at least one person will greet you and ask how you are,” she writes.

“I think that’s so extremely nice. Getting a smile from a stranger can make the whole day a lot better. I am almost sure that there are much nicer people abroad than in Norway,” writes Emily, also commenting about Norwegians’ alcohol habits and small-talk abilities.

Audun Pettersen, head of department for tourism at Innovation Norway, said to NRK he agrees with what the 16-year-old says.

“Tourists tell us that Norwegians are a bit difficult to get in touch with. We are often seen as cold, and it's probably a cultural thing. We’re not people who dash up to complete strangers at the first meeting.”

Mr Pettersen added his experience is tourists complain most about the prices, toll roads, timetables, and the difficulty in finding genuine Norwegian food.

The broadcaster found foreigners who explain their feelings about Norwegians is completely the opposite.

Russian Elena Grech, who is visiting Oslo from Moscow with her mother, finds Norwegians are an open and welcoming people.

“We have been very well-received here in Norway. People are open and pleasant, she says. It is much less here stressful than in Moscow. We have received good service at restaurants, and people are relaxed and pleasant,” she said.

“People in Norway are open and friendly,” declared German couple Bonny Janick and Paul Radziejewski. “We came here by car, and met a man showed us the way to a parking lot and he let us take his spot when we were looking for parking in Oslo."

“That would never happen at home in Germany,” they related, concluding people in Norway are more spontaneous and more open to talking to strangers.




Published on Thursday, 21st March, 2013 at 16:50 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Shruti Chauhan   .
Last updated on 21st March 2013 at 17:50.

This post has the following tags: tourismnorway, foreignersnorway, coldnorwegians.





  
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