Funeral and burial trends changing / News / The Foreigner

Funeral and burial trends changing. Companies around the world are now offering hi-tech and different options regarding cemeteries and funerals. Their popularity appears to be increasing in Norway too, reports say. One way technology is used is putting QR (Quick Response) codes on headstones. When scanned, the mobile user’s browser goes to a website with information about the deceased. This can include images, text, audio, and video. These QR codes are becoming a popular sight in some cemeteries in countries such as Germany. The option will be available in Norway at Vår frelsers Cemetery in Oslo’s Gamle Aker district next year.

funerals, burials, norway



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Funeral and burial trends changing

Published on Tuesday, 30th December, 2014 at 07:47 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Companies around the world are now offering hi-tech and different options regarding cemeteries and funerals. Their popularity appears to be increasing in Norway too, reports say.

Funeral flowers
Funeral flowers
Photo: Mogens Engelund/Wikimedia Commons


One way technology is used is putting QR (Quick Response) codes on headstones. When scanned, the mobile user’s browser goes to a website with information about the deceased. This can include images, text, audio, and video.

These QR codes are becoming a popular sight in some cemeteries in countries such as Germany. The option will be available in Norway at Vår frelsers Cemetery in Oslo’s Gamle Aker district next year.

Famous Norwegians buried there include painter Thomas Fearnley (1802-42), writer Bjørnstjerne Bjørson (1832-1910), who authored the lyrics to Norway’s National Anthem Ja, vi elsker dette landet, and writer and independence fighter Henrik Wergeland (1808-45).

Norwegian Conservative politician and Parliamentary President, Carl Joachim ‘C.J.’ Hambro (1885-1964) and painter Edvard Munch (1863-1944) were also been laid to rest in the cemetery.

Stein Olav Hohle, acting director of Oslo municipality’s cemeteries and burials agency, says the decision to use QR Codes is due to a long-standing “need for easily accessible information about famous people” buried at Vår frelser’s cemetery.

In Denmark, about a dozen families in Copenhagen have used QR codes so far. Interest in the technological mark is increasing from individuals too.

“It seems that technology is most relevant when it concerns young people who have died suddenly. I think a digital extension of our present headstone inscriptions will become increasingly common,” anthropologist Gitte Lunding said to NRK.

And it is not just QR codes that are making modern funerals different. The past two years have seen a slight increase in interest in Norway for spreading ashes following cremation – 1.62 per cent in 2012, and 2.25 per cent in 2013, Dagbladet reported.

Moreover, a US-based company called MesoLoft uses a type of balloon to launch and release ashes into the Mesosphere – a layer of Earth’s atmosphere located between the Stratopause and Mesopause.

These ashes are released at 75,000 feet (22,900 M) or higher, according to the company.



Published on Tuesday, 30th December, 2014 at 07:47 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: funerals, burials, norway.





  
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