Gifted Norway schoolchild’s parents lose hope and move to Denmark / News / The Foreigner

Gifted Norway schoolchild’s parents lose hope and move to Denmark. Inadequate challenges for one couple’s child at egalitarian state school in Norway lead to illness and relocation to the Continent. “We have a child who’s had a terrible time at school with persistent absence. We have tried everything. Now we are desperate. You do what you must to save a child,” mother to now nine-year-old Vilde, told Aftenposten. Vilde started having headaches, stomachaches, altering her behaviour not long after starting school at aged six. Her parents took her for tests at Haukeland University Hospital.

norwayeducation, norwayday-care, pre-schools, norwayuniversities



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Gifted Norway schoolchild’s parents lose hope and move to Denmark

Published on Wednesday, 7th August, 2013 at 16:25 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Inadequate challenges for one couple’s child at egalitarian state school in Norway lead to illness and relocation to the Continent.

A blackboard (illustration photo)
A blackboard (illustration photo)
Photo: Patrick Quinn-Graham/Flickr


“We have a child who’s had a terrible time at school with persistent absence. We have tried everything. Now we are desperate. You do what you must to save a child,” mother to now nine-year-old Vilde, told Aftenposten.

Vilde started having headaches, stomachaches, altering her behaviour not long after starting school at aged six. Her parents took her for tests at Haukeland University Hospital.

Medical personnel subsequently informed them nothing was wrong with their daughter, purely that she was highly-gifted.

“She’d developed physical symptoms because she was so far ahead of the others and did not learn in school,” her mother said, adding that all attempts at finding different schools or getting adequate tailor-made tuition failed.

The Foreigner has previously reported about Norway’s pre-school education, lacking compulsory school teachers’ adequacy in subjects such as maths.

Free education at Norway’s state schools has been declined in favour of private, and record numbers of parents are applying for places for their child at international schools.

At the same time, education unions and some politicians have both attacked and censured attempts to offer school schemes geared towards talented pupils.

Internationally-recognised tests have shown only marginal improvements in the Norwegian schooling system, between 2006 and 2010.

Moreover, higher up the educational echelon, it has been found that Norwegian universities trail their Nordic counterparts.

Kjell Skogen, Professor of Special Education at the University of Oslo, commented to Aftenposten about Norwegian schools’ lacking ability to cater for gifted children.

“There’s a way of thinking in Norway that is based on that gifted children will always manage by themselves. But a child will develop problems if it has to underperform because it doesn’t get help to develop and extend itself.”

Mette Sæhle Nilsen and her family are moving southwards from western Norway’s Bergen to Denmark this week. Vilde is to start at a private school for gifted children in the city of Aalborg this autumn.



Published on Wednesday, 7th August, 2013 at 16:25 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayeducation, norwayday-care, pre-schools, norwayuniversities.





  
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