Gjøa platform gets land-based power / News / The Foreigner

Gjøa platform gets land-based power. Statoil’s Gjøa platform was powered up last Sunday, when its electricity supply from the company’s Mongstad facility was turned on. Gjøa requires a maximum of 40 megawatts of electricity from land, and is supplied with via a 100 kilometer-long, 90,000-volt alternating current cable. The cable has a static part and a flexible one. According to Statoil, the technology required for its manufacture is groundbreaking.

statoilgjoea, platform, mongstad, land-based, cable, electricity, co2, carbon, dioxide, emissions, reduction, alternating, current



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Gjøa platform gets land-based power

Published on Friday, 16th July, 2010 at 17:52 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.
Last Updated on 17th July 2010 at 10:28.

Statoil’s Gjøa platform was powered up last Sunday, when its electricity supply from the company’s Mongstad facility was turned on.

Gjøa platform
Gjøa platform
Photo: Statoil/Tommy Solstad


Gjøa requires a maximum of 40 megawatts of electricity from land, and is supplied with via a 100 kilometer-long, 90,000-volt alternating current cable.

The cable has a static part and a flexible one. According to Statoil, the technology required for its manufacture is groundbreaking.

“Developing and adopting new technology is our most important measure for reducing the environmental impact of our operations,” Bjørn Midttun, head of subsea installations, pipelines and marine operations on the Gjøa field says in a press release.

The traditional way of powering platforms is by using gas turbines as electricity generators. Statoil’s predictions are that supplying the Gjøa platform with land-based electricity will supposedly reduce CO2 emissions by 210,000 tons annually.

“This is a good example of how Statoil can play a part in solving some of the climate challenges in collaboration with the supplies industry,” Midttun says.



Published on Friday, 16th July, 2010 at 17:52 under the news category, by Ramona Tancau.
Last updated on 17th July 2010 at 10:28.

This post has the following tags: statoilgjoea, platform, mongstad, land-based, cable, electricity, co2, carbon, dioxide, emissions, reduction, alternating, current.





  
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