Government faces growing pressure over Hardanger / News / The Foreigner

Government faces growing pressure over Hardanger. The government’s recent decision to build power lines over Hardangervidda hasn’t gone down well with politicians or the public. Amidst increasing resistance to the project come calls for legal changes. Even though the project would spoil what many locals, foreign tourists, and hikers regard as beautiful natural surroundings the government ignored appeals, using the Energy Law (Energiloven) as the basis for making its decision. “The law was only made to ensure a good energy supply to the people. But it doesn’t consider the environment, nor does it take the interests of local industry, in this case travel and fishing, into account,” Liberal Party (V) leader Trine Skei Grande tells The Foreigner.

trine, skei, grande, liberal, venstre, labour, ap, party, government, hardanger, power, pylons, lines



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Government faces growing pressure over Hardanger

Published on Tuesday, 3rd August, 2010 at 14:04 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The government’s recent decision to build power lines over Hardangervidda hasn’t gone down well with politicians or the public. Amidst increasing resistance to the project come calls for legal changes.

Power pylons
Power pylons
Photo: Statnett


Postponement

Even though the project would spoil what many locals, foreign tourists, and hikers regard as beautiful natural surroundings the government ignored appeals, using the Energy Law (Energiloven) as the basis for making its decision.

“The law was only made to ensure a good energy supply to the people. But it doesn’t consider the environment, nor does it take the interests of local industry, in this case travel and fishing, into account,” Liberal Party (V) leader Trine Skei Grande tells The Foreigner.

As these issues aren’t part of Parliamentary law, the government isn’t obliged to consider them.

“That’s why we want to see the law amended. We won’t be bringing the matter up in Parliament ourselves, but want construction to be postponed until these questions have been considered. The government used a very long time to make its decision, so it could wait a few more days,” she says.

Pressure

Labour (Ap) has a majority, but they have no support from local governmental Parties, according to Skei Grande.

“There’s a lot of trouble for the government on the west coast, and it will increase. There’s also a big march in the Hardanger Mountains coming up shortly.”

She believes it’s likely the decision will be reversed.

“People are gradually changing the government’s attitude. There are also the local elections coming up next year. Each Party needs seven candidates to be represented. Labour will have difficulties if it can’t find them.”




Published on Tuesday, 3rd August, 2010 at 14:04 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: trine, skei, grande, liberal, venstre, labour, ap, party, government, hardanger, power, pylons, lines.





  
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