Government gives 60 million to arctic broadband / News / The Foreigner

Government gives 60 million to arctic broadband. Research facility to join 21st Century information highway. The Norwegian government is to spend 60 million kroner on the world’s northernmost settlement. The Svalbard archipelago is about to benefit from a new fibre optic cable between the village of Ny-Ålesund on the west coast of Spitsbergen and Longyearbyen Ny-Ålesund has an international research base for a wide range of studies in natural sciences owned and run by the Kings Bay AS Company. Ten world countries have established research stations in the settlement.

svalbard, ny-aalesund, spitsbergen, longyearbyen, research, facility, nasa, mapping, authority, broadband, cable



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Government gives 60 million to arctic broadband

Published on Monday, 10th May, 2010 at 20:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Research facility to join 21st Century information highway.

Svalbard, Ny-Ålesund research station
Svalbard, Ny-Ålesund research station
Photo: Jerzy Strzelecki/Wikimedia Commons


Old-fashioned

The Norwegian government is to spend 60 million kroner on the world’s northernmost settlement. The Svalbard archipelago is about to benefit from a new fibre optic cable between the village of Ny-Ålesund on the west coast of Spitsbergen and Longyearbyen

Ny-Ålesund has an international research base for a wide range of studies in natural sciences owned and run by the Kings Bay AS Company. Ten world countries have established research stations in the settlement.

For now, scientists have to contend with transferring data to the world via radio links, and the Norwegian Mapping Authority (Statens Kartverk) has had to send all of their CD-based information to Longyearbyen by helicopter twice a week.

According to the authority’s Mapping Manager, Anne Cathrine Frøstrup, this creates a potential problem for their international partners such as NASA, as they require fresh data transmitted directly.

Pleased

NASA has cooperated closely with, and used data from the facility for years, but has kept activity to a minimum until due to the authority’s economic constraints.

The agency says it will now be fully operational, however. NASA wants to offer new types services using data from the observatory based on the large natural disasters caused by movements in the Earth’s crust.

Before the cable, there were fears the observatory would have to close within five years, but the government’s 60 million kroner move means there are now smiles all round.

“This is a great day for the whole Ny-Ålesund community, for international research, climate research, as well as the Mapping Authority,” Frøstrup tells NRK.

The Socialist Left’s (SV) Minister of Research and Higher Education, Tora Aasland, believes the new cable will strengthen Ny-Ålesund’s role in international research.

“Obtaining data quickly is critical today, and the cable is a prerequisite for working in a more modern and efficient way,” she says.

Work on the 260 kilometre-long cable beneath the seabed is expected to start sometime this year.



Published on Monday, 10th May, 2010 at 20:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: svalbard, ny-aalesund, spitsbergen, longyearbyen, research, facility, nasa, mapping, authority, broadband, cable.





  
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