Government ‘phone around’ decided Norwegian Libyan engagement / News / The Foreigner

Government ‘phone around’ decided Norwegian Libyan engagement. In the midst of the debate over Norway’s role in Libya come reports politicians agreed to commit its F-16s purely by phone. Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre and Minister of Defence Grete Faremo confirmed the government would contribute to a NATO-led attack on Friday, 18th March. There were many phone calls, both before and during the weekend, without one face-to-face parliamentary or governmental meeting, reports Aftenposten.

jonasgahrstoere, jensstoltenberg, operationodysseydawn, libyano-flyzone, muammaral-gaddafi



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Government ‘phone around’ decided Norwegian Libyan engagement

Published on Tuesday, 19th April, 2011 at 13:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

In the midst of the debate over Norway’s role in Libya come reports politicians agreed to commit its F-16s purely by phone.

Two F-16s under takeoff from Souda Bay
Two F-16s under takeoff from Souda Bay
Photo: Forsvarets mediesenter/Lars Magne Hovtun


Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre and Minister of Defence Grete Faremo confirmed the government would contribute to a NATO-led attack on Friday, 18th March.

There were many phone calls, both before and during the weekend, without one face-to-face parliamentary or governmental meeting, reports Aftenposten.

“It was clear what they [the US, UK, and France] needed most were fighter jets,” FM Støre tells the paper.”

Just one day later, broad political consensus was a fact.

“I rang all the [Opposition’s] parliamentary leaders whilst the Prime Minister was on his way to Paris, informing them that as far as Norway was concerned, these were what we would be sending.”

Coalition and Opposition politicians criticise how things were handled.

“It’s completely wrong, formally, that parliament uses time to discuss small adjustments and changes to the budget instead of on whether or not to send fighter jets to war,” says Bård Vegard Solhjell, parliamentary leader for the Social Democratic Party (SV).

Liberal Party (V) leader Trine Skei Grande believes, “We ask Norwegians to risk their lives, and I think the least we can do is to ensure such an important matter is raised in parliament.”

Trygve Slagsvold Vedum, the Centre Party’s (Sp) parliamentary leader, is calling for a debate.

Nevertheless, representatives for both the Conservative (H) and Progress (FrP) Parties, argue it would have been difficult to do things differently.

“Things happened so quickly and this is what the situation in Libya demanded. To a certain degree, the path was forged as we went along,” Ine Maria Søreide, leader of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs for the Conservatives (H), says.

“It was, mildly-speaking, chaotic from the word go,” says Morten Høglund, FrP’s representative on the same committee.




Published on Tuesday, 19th April, 2011 at 13:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: jonasgahrstoere, jensstoltenberg, operationodysseydawn, libyano-flyzone, muammaral-gaddafi.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!