Government to provide anti-Semitism teaching courses / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Government to provide anti-Semitism teaching courses. Norway’s government is to pledge six million kroner to teaching courses in a bid to combat anti-Semitism and racism. Results from last week’s report about Oslo’s secondary schools show more than half of all students said they heard the word “Jew” used as an insult. 33.3% of Jewish students said they experienced harassment between two and three times a month. Jewish leaders from the U.S. have been in Oslo this week to discuss how Norway plans to eradicate anti-Semitism and racism from the country.

osloholocaustcentre, anti-semitisminnorway, simonwiesenthalcentre, anti-defamationleague



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Government to provide anti-Semitism teaching courses

Published on Thursday, 16th June, 2011 at 19:05 under the news category, by Jessica Batey.

Norway’s government is to pledge six million kroner to teaching courses in a bid to combat anti-Semitism and racism.



Results from last week’s report about Oslo’s secondary schools show more than half of all students said they heard the word “Jew” used as an insult. 33.3% of Jewish students said they experienced harassment between two and three times a month.

Jewish leaders from the U.S. have been in Oslo this week to discuss how Norway plans to eradicate anti-Semitism and racism from the country.

Minister of Education for the Socialist Left (SV), Kristin Halvorsen, has already promised that new measures will be put in place, and says the six million kroner is to provide courses for schoolteachers in how to work against racism and anti-Semitism.

Despite such positive steps, however, the American Jewish leaders feel it will be too difficult to judge Ms Halvorsen’s initiative.

“The courses sound good, but we have not seen how they plan on carrying them out,” Naomi Mazin, one of the education section directors at the Anti-Defamation League, tells Vårt Land.

Director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in the U.S. Mark Weitzman says, “It’s a start, but how much it will help depends on their impact on the teachers.

A ten-point action plan against anti-Semitism proposed by the Christian Democratic Party (KrF), supported by just the Progress Party (FrP), was discussed in Parliament today. MPs also admit they have seriously underestimated anti-Semitic attitudes.

“We believed that anti-Semitism could be handled in one go together with Islamophobia and other racist attitudes. However, in the last few years, we have realized that anti-Semitism must be handled separately,” says Bård Vegar Solhjell, SV’s Parliamentary leader, admitting his Party is working with some of the government’s proposals.

“We have not taken anti-Semitism or racism seriously enough, probably because we do not want to criticise our society’s weaker or minority groups in society”, says Labour’s (Ap) Barth Eide, Deputy Minister at the Ministry of Defence.

A national survey from Oslo’s Holocaust Centre, aimed at understanding levels of anti-Semitism in Norway, is due for completion in the spring next year.  




Published on Thursday, 16th June, 2011 at 19:05 under the news category, by Jessica Batey.

This post has the following tags: osloholocaustcentre, anti-semitisminnorway, simonwiesenthalcentre, anti-defamationleague.





  
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