Greens advocate duty-free veto / News / The Foreigner

Greens advocate duty-free veto. Norwegian environmentalists are calling for a ban on airport tax free sales to reduce greenhouse gases. Annual CO2 emissions could sink by up to 185,000 tons if Norwegians’ ‘thirst’ for cheaper drinks and tobacco remains unquenched, according to a new report handed to the Ministry of Transport and Communications. This would account for a reduction of approximately 9 percent. Airports authority Avinor says about 4.3 million passengers travelled on international flights up to the beginning of May. A Friends of the Earth Norway spokesperson says he is concerned about the effect on the environment, calling the duty-free system ‘illogical’

avinor, duty-freesales, friendsoftheearthnorway, co2emissions



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Greens advocate duty-free veto

Published on Monday, 30th May, 2011 at 16:17 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norwegian environmentalists are calling for a ban on airport tax free sales to reduce greenhouse gases.

Duty-free sign
Duty-free sign
Photo: Resonants/IStockphoto


Annual CO2 emissions could sink by up to 185,000 tons if Norwegians’ ‘thirst’ for cheaper drinks and tobacco remains unquenched, according to a new report handed to the Ministry of Transport and Communications. This would account for a reduction of approximately 9 percent.

Airports authority Avinor says about 4.3 million passengers travelled on international flights up to the beginning of May. A Friends of the Earth Norway spokesperson says he is concerned about the effect on the environment, calling the duty-free system ‘illogical’

“It’s high time that Norway follows the EU and scraps it. If Norwegian authorities believe the population deserves cheaper goods, then they should ensure there are tax cuts instead of having low prices when you fly,” Holger Schlaupitz tells Dagsavisen.

Talking about all flights, the organisation also advocates the government introduce measure to try and reduce traffic, and freeze all further airport expansion plans immediately.

Arild Hermstad, head of The Future in Our Hands (Framtiden I våre hender), Norway's largest environmental organisation according to its website, also alleges the duty-free system “contributes to increased damage to the environment, especially because Avinor’s solid profits from their sale goes towards holding flight taxes down.”

Avinor’s press spokesperson, Ove Narvesen, tells The Foreigner this is only part of the picture, however.

“We mainly use the money to subsidise 42 of our airports that run at a loss. Only Oslo, Bergen Stavanger and Trondheim operate with a profit. Sales of duty-free only contribute a little towards keeping taxes down.”

According to Mr Narvesen, funding part of the company’s airport running costs from these was decided by their owners the government.

“It will have to put aside money in the annual state budget if it wants to finance these in another way. Furthermore, the major part of the income on duty free goods does not come from alcohol or tobacco products, but cosmetics and perfumes,” he says.




Published on Monday, 30th May, 2011 at 16:17 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: avinor, duty-freesales, friendsoftheearthnorway, co2emissions.





  
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