Growing support for Data Retention Directive / News / The Foreigner

Growing support for Data Retention Directive. “Many think they’ve nothing to hide, but we all have,” says senior Data Inspectorate advisor. 51 percent of the public are in favour of implementing the EU’s Data Retention Directive (DRD), according to a new opinion poll carried out by the global market research company Synovate. “The news is unexpectedly good because this shows people can see how the directive manages to balance the state’s need to give its inhabitants security with the individual’s need for privacy,” the Conservative (H) MP Arve Kambe, who supports the directive, tells Klassekampen.

eu, data, retention, directive, ap, labour, h, conservative, party, monitory, surveillance



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Growing support for Data Retention Directive

Published on Wednesday, 5th May, 2010 at 10:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 6th May 2010 at 13:00.

“Many think they’ve nothing to hide, but we all have,” says senior Data Inspectorate advisor.

Traffic surveillance camera
Traffic surveillance camera
Photo: Adrian Short/Flickr


Positive surprise

51 percent of the public are in favour of implementing the EU’s Data Retention Directive (DRD), according to a new opinion poll carried out by the global market research company Synovate.

“The news is unexpectedly good because this shows people can see how the directive manages to balance the state’s need to give its inhabitants security with the individual’s need for privacy,” the Conservative (H) MP Arve Kambe, who supports the directive, tells Klassekampen.

The poll also reveals 44 and 48 percent are in favour of the directive amongst Socialist Left (SV) and Liberal Party (V) voters, respectively, whilst the “no’s” account for 41 and 43..

These results are also surprising, the paper believes, as both Parties are against the DRD. Labour (Ap) is the only Party who wants to implement it, whilst the Conservatives (H) are wavering about the issue.

“Many politicians who are in favour of the DRD have been afraid to come down off the fence because they know there’ll be uproar if they do,” says Kambe.

Vanished

“I’m not particularly surprised by the results. We often see that security-related claims frequently beat those arguing for privacy, when it comes to public opinion. I believe the one-sided arguments by both police and criminal police (Kripos) could have had an influential hand in the debate,” says Conservative MP Torbjørn Røe Isaksen, who warns strongly against the directive’s introduction.

He goes on to say unlike in the EU, the discussion in Norway has become narrow. One of the biggest arguments against the DLD – which he claims isn’t about privacy but how ineffective the DLD will be in the fight against crime and terror – has partly disappeared from the debate.

Gunnel Helmers, senior adviser at the Data Inspectorate (Datatilsynet), believes people don’t take privacy seriously enough.

“Even though people are increasingly concerned about privacy, we see a tendency towards numerous believing it doesn’t concern them. It’s a rather abstract issue, and many think they’ve nothing to hide. But we all do,” he says.

Disrespectful

Lars-Henrik Parup Michelson – head the independent bipartisan campaign organisation against the DRD “Stopp Datalagringsdirektivet” – thinks results from the poll are irrelevant, however.

“We’re talking about a directive that will introduce one of the most comprehensive surveillance regimes in Norway’s history. The fact 50 percent are in favour is unimportant. In any case, human rights should protect the minority. Even if 99 percent voted in favour, I believe you must respect the 1 percent who wants to keep their privacy.”

31 percent were against the directive, whilst the “don’t knows” accounted for 18.




Published on Wednesday, 5th May, 2010 at 10:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 6th May 2010 at 13:00.

This post has the following tags: eu, data, retention, directive, ap, labour, h, conservative, party, monitory, surveillance.





  
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