‘Hyttebok’ links past with present / News / The Foreigner

‘Hyttebok’ links past with present. The next time you read the visitor’s book at a Norwegian mountain cabin (‘hyttebok’), it could prove to be interesting and up-to-date, according to a postgraduate. University of Bergen Master’s student, Reidun Irene Bjordal, argues her perhaps untraditional dissertation about comments in these reveals people’s need to be seen. “My theory that people didn’t write so differently 100 years ago has been mostly confirmed. I believe people have a need to communicate. Very many of them write, ‘the walk took five-and-a-half hours’. It’s as if they want to blow their own trumpet,” she tells NRK, having read some of The Norwegian Trekking Association’s (DNT) books at 146 of their cabins nationwide.

hytteboknorwegianmountaincabin, facebook, twitter



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‘Hyttebok’ links past with present

Published on Wednesday, 20th April, 2011 at 12:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The next time you read the visitor’s book at a Norwegian mountain cabin (‘hyttebok’), it could prove to be interesting and up-to-date, according to a postgraduate.

Sellanrå Turisthytte, Nordmarka, Oslo (illus. ph.)
Sellanrå Turisthytte, Nordmarka, Oslo (illus. ph.)
Photo: Hans Edvard Sunde/Wikimedia Commons


University of Bergen Master’s student, Reidun Irene Bjordal, argues her perhaps untraditional dissertation about comments in these reveals people’s need to be seen.

“My theory that people didn’t write so differently 100 years ago has been mostly confirmed. I believe people have a need to communicate. Very many of them write, ‘the walk took five-and-a-half hours’. It’s as if they want to blow their own trumpet,” she tells NRK, having read some of The Norwegian Trekking Association’s (DNT) books at 146 of their cabins nationwide.

Comparing them to Facebook and blogs, Ms Bjordal claims, “You get to comment in them. They are dynamic.”

Like Twitter, space is limited.

“There was a long story talking about a horse that refused to go on, forcing them to carry their supplies themselves. It rained and they got wet, walking in the clothes they were wearing. They then [described the event] using the smallest writing possible,” she says.

Moreover, although she admits much of what she has read is not particularly interesting, Ms Bjordal picks one memorable example.

“The weather; as changeable as a woman.”



Published on Wednesday, 20th April, 2011 at 12:42 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: hytteboknorwegianmountaincabin, facebook, twitter.





  
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