Ill man saves self from icy river, rescue personnel could not help / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Ill man saves self from icy river, rescue personnel could not help. A diabetic suffering from heart problems survived for two hours alone before being saved because emergency service staff did not understand Sami. Johan Oskar Eriksen ended up in the icy Finnmarksvidda river after the quad bike he was on developed engine problems and stopped. The 39-year-old was attempting last week's crossing sixty kilometres (about 37 miles) southwest of Karasjok, Øst-Finnmark county, when the current swept the bike away.

samilanguagenorway, rescuepersonnelnorway



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Ill man saves self from icy river, rescue personnel could not help

Published on Tuesday, 30th October, 2012 at 08:56 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 30th October 2012 at 09:45.

A diabetic suffering from heart problems survived for two hours alone before being saved because emergency service staff did not understand Sami.



Johan Oskar Eriksen ended up in the icy Finnmarksvidda river after the quad bike he was on developed engine problems and stopped.

The 39-year-old was attempting last week's crossing sixty kilometres (about 37 miles) southwest of Karasjok, Øst-Finnmark county, when the current swept the bike away.

“I got ashore and lit a fire,” he said to NRK. “I lay there for a couple of hours to get warm, but my clothes were soaked.”

Mr Eriksen’s ordeal was not over, however. Having walked several kilometres in the mountains to find mobile coverage, emergency service staff could not understand his location despite his several attempts because it was in Sami.

“I rang 113 and told them I was in poor condition. I was put through to the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC) Northern Norway after a while. It [my location] was Bávttajohka, a major river on the south side of Beaivvašgieddi, which was also on the map,” he explained.

“I tried to guide them to me by saying that they could find me if they flew up the Bávttajohka valley, but they said they couldn’t find the valley on the map. I then fell asleep, chilled to the bone.”

Luckily, two hunters subsequently found Mr Eriksen and guided the helicopter already in the area to where they were using GPS coordinates. 

He says they saved him from freezing to death. Mr Eriksen was admitted to Hammerfest hospital.

JRCC Northern Norway head of division Tore Vangsfjord agreed the incident was serious based on how the broadcaster portrayed it, “but as I said, I have no detailed knowledge of the event so I cannot say anything about what has happened.”

“The rescue service’s Sami-speaking part is locally based. So far, there has been no mention of us hiring Sami-speaking personnel. We’ll now be taking a closer look at this particular event and see if it is something that should have consequences,” he concluded.



Published on Tuesday, 30th October, 2012 at 08:56 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 30th October 2012 at 09:45.

This post has the following tags: samilanguagenorway, rescuepersonnelnorway.





  
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