Illness affects Norwegians and Swedes differently / News / The Foreigner

Illness affects Norwegians and Swedes differently. The Scandinavian oil-rich country’s workers are more likely to sneeze at staying at home and go to work with a cold than Swedes, new joint Norwegian-Swedish research suggests. 25 per cent of Norwegians, who take Fridays off, think the respiratory track affliction combined with a slight fever is a good enough reason to call in ill. According to the ‘Social causes for sick leave’ study led by Professor Rolf Rønning at Lillehammer University College, the figure is 59 per cent for Swedes.

norwaysickleave, worknorway



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Illness affects Norwegians and Swedes differently

Published on Wednesday, 25th September, 2013 at 14:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 25th September 2013 at 16:28.

The Scandinavian oil-rich country’s workers are more likely to sneeze at staying at home and go to work with a cold than Swedes, new joint Norwegian-Swedish research suggests.

Clinical thermometer
Clinical thermometer
Photo: David/Wikimedia Commons


25 per cent of Norwegians, who take Fridays off, think the respiratory track affliction combined with a slight fever is a good enough reason to call in ill.

According to the ‘Social causes for sick leave’ study led by Professor Rolf Rønning at Lillehammer University College, the figure is 59 per cent for Swedes.

“The inquiry in no way supports the myth of a poor work ethic and laziness among Norwegians,” the Professor told business daily Dagens Næringsliv.

Moreover, 45 per cent of sick Norwegians answered they go to work anyway because they like their job. 22 per cent do because they pride themselves in carrying on, despite their ills. These are 29 and 10 per cent for Swedes, respectively.

They (Norwegians) are not as reticent about infecting their customers and co-workers as their Swedish peers either, the study shows.

Arnstein Mykletun, senior researcher at the Institute of Public Health who led the 2010 government-appointed commission regarding sick leave, dispenses the bitter pill to swallow with the results’ interpretation.

One of the questions participants answered was “have you been at work the past year when you were so ill that you could have stayed at home instead?”

“Sick leave levels in Sweden are about half of those in Norway, while the standard of public health is about the same. This attitude survey says nothing about actual real differences, just the perception of these,” said Mr Mykletun.

Business news website NA24.no published an article in April this year showing sick leave levels were 3 per cent in Sweden, against 6.6 per cent in Norway.

The Eastern Norway Research Institute, University of Stockholm, and Karolinksa Institutet also participated in the Lillehammer University College-led survey.




Published on Wednesday, 25th September, 2013 at 14:38 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 25th September 2013 at 16:28.

This post has the following tags: norwaysickleave, worknorway.





  
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