Immigrants lose out on council jobs / News / The Foreigner

Immigrants lose out on council jobs. Labour politician alleges Stavanger council omits calling in applicants. Stavanger claims to be an international city with many foreigners from different countries and cultures living in and around it. Despite this, few get called for job interviews.No idea “We have no system that monitors how many immigrants have worked, or currently work for us. But we do have measures that are meant to ensure those who should be called in for interview are, though there’s no system to guarantee this,” the council’s Ingrid Hauge Rasmussen, Consultant Advisor for Diversity and Integration, tells The Foreigner.

stavanger, council, municipality, immigrants, job, interviews, applicants, integration, culture, labour, ap



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Immigrants lose out on council jobs

Published on Thursday, 15th April, 2010 at 14:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 16th April 2010 at 12:14.

Labour politician alleges Stavanger council omits calling in applicants.

Stavanger council buildings
Stavanger council buildings
Photo: nettopp/Flickr


Stavanger claims to be an international city with many foreigners from different countries and cultures living in and around it. Despite this, few get called for job interviews.

No idea

“We have no system that monitors how many immigrants have worked, or currently work for us. But we do have measures that are meant to ensure those who should be called in for interview are, though there’s no system to guarantee this,” the council’s Ingrid Hauge Rasmussen, Consultant Advisor for Diversity and Integration, tells The Foreigner.

This doesn’t please Labour’s (Ap) local representative and member of the Immigrant Advisory Board (Innvandrerådet), Anne Torill Stensberg Lura.

“I asked them for a report about the situation two months ago and am still waiting for an answer. I want the facts on the table,” she says.

Lura thinks it strange that more immigrants aren’t called in, given that Norway suffers from a shortage of competent and educated people in many areas of the job market.

Complicated

According to Rasmussen, Lura’s claims don’t give a proper picture.

“I haven’t been informed about them. It’s also difficult to know who applies for which job.”

The council also has quite a few schemes and projects to enhance immigrant recruitment, as well as a consultancy service for leaders who would like to put multicultural recruitment on the agenda.

But Lura still expects Stavanger to give the Advisory Board a proper answer, so they can work to improve things. She also says then Labour may also be able to come with suggestions.

“I know of specific examples of African applicants who have never even received a reply to their application. Stavanger’s immigrant population is between 12 and 14 percent, and the council should be more proactive when it comes to hiring them.”  

Measures

Rasmussen says the council will be ordering a report from Statistics Norway (SSB) in the near future to see how many immigrants they employ, together with which countries they come from.

They will then be able to address the challenge of finding out if the measures they have are effective, or if they need either new or additional ones.

“We want to become better about attracting, recruiting, and keeping qualified foreign personnel, as well seeing how we can best use any other competence they have,” she says.

This is no bad thing, according to Lura,

“There’s no point in using time and money on things that don’t work. I believe the council is positive, but it’s not sure they have the right means to get results.”

In the meantime, Rasmussen encourages Lura to contact her with specific details about those immigrants she knows haven’t been called for interview so she can follow them up.

“I’ve spoken to her about it before, but I can ring her again,” says Lura.



Published on Thursday, 15th April, 2010 at 14:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 16th April 2010 at 12:14.

This post has the following tags: stavanger, council, municipality, immigrants, job, interviews, applicants, integration, culture, labour, ap.





  
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