Immigrants pose higher road hazard / News / The Foreigner

Immigrants pose higher road hazard. Foreigners originally for outside Norway are involved in more traffic accidents than domestic-born drivers are, statistics suggest. Danny Ghazanfar Chaudhry, a Norwegian-Pakistani driving instructor in Oslo, is not surprised by the figures. He told Aftenposten afternoon edition Aften, “Many of those who come to Norway have driven cars at home. Thus, they have brought a completely different driving culture with them than is usually found I Norway.

foreigndriversnorway, immigrantdrivertrainingnorway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Immigrants pose higher road hazard

Published on Saturday, 11th February, 2012 at 11:44 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Foreigners originally for outside Norway are involved in more traffic accidents than domestic-born drivers are, statistics suggest.

L-Plate (illustration photo)
L-Plate (illustration photo)
Photo: tgraham/Flickr


Danny Ghazanfar Chaudhry, a Norwegian-Pakistani driving instructor in Oslo, is not surprised by the figures.

He told Aftenposten afternoon edition Aften, “Many of those who come to Norway have driven cars at home. Thus, they have brought a completely different driving culture with them than is usually found I Norway.

“In Pakistan, for example, the driver has more rights than pedestrians and cyclists. It is different in Norway. Moreover, drivers will spend several years getting rid of their original driving culture, even if they pass the Norwegian driver training.”

Norwegian-Somali sisters Fartun and Nimo Aadan aged 30 and 25 have lived in Norway for 15 years and are surprised by what the statistics show.

“A solution may be more compulsory courses. It is, after all, a matter of safety for us and our fellow drivers”, they said.

Using a Swedish study as well, the paper also reports the likelihood of an accident is higher for male and female drivers from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia.

Guru Ranes, director of road safety of public roads, has been working on a solution, he told Aftenposten

“We have started revising the plan of action for road safety together with our partners. It may, for example, be a matter of integrating driver training into the introductory programme [and Norwegian language training for newly arrived immigrants] and having brochures in several languages.”




Published on Saturday, 11th February, 2012 at 11:44 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: foreigndriversnorway, immigrantdrivertrainingnorway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!