Increased meat price warning / News / The Foreigner

Increased meat price warning. Supplier Nortura tells Norwegian consumers to expect a noticeable increase in the cost of meat. “Prices have decreased by seven percent in the last year, and have never been as low,” Head of Communications Nina Sundqvist tells NRK. According to Ms Sundqvist, meat prices in Norway have been considerably cheap, but results from the first third of the year published on its website show Nortura is now spending more on revenue and expenditure compared with the same time last year.

audunlysbakken, marineharvest, nortura, norwegianmeatprices



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Increased meat price warning

Published on Monday, 6th June, 2011 at 15:46 under the news category, by John Price   .

Supplier Nortura tells Norwegian consumers to expect a noticeable increase in the cost of meat.

Cows in a field
Cows in a field
Photo: ©2015 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


“Prices have decreased by seven percent in the last year, and have never been as low,” Head of Communications Nina Sundqvist tells NRK.

According to Ms Sundqvist, meat prices in Norway have been considerably cheap, but results from the first third of the year published on its website show Nortura is now spending more on revenue and expenditure compared with the same time last year.

Commenting on the situation, acting CEO Runar Larsen says, “everyone will have to get used to the fact prices will increase from the summer.”

Low prices are not a problem in some other food industry sectors, however. Seafood and largest global salmon farming company Marine Harvest has experienced healthy profits this year. Q1 figures show an operational EBIT of approximately NOK 903million after a sharp rise in salmon prices throughout 2010 and into 2011.

Meanwhile, Norwegian shoppers are used to high food costs at the expense of broader selection. There are currently no regulations regarding food prices in Norway, prompting calls by the Minister of Children, Equality and Social Inclusion, Audun Lysbakken,  to introduce a policy which would be easier for consumers.

“I would like Norwegian consumers to have a broader selection and greater diversity in stores in the future,” he said in response to conclusions by the government-appointed Food Chain Committee, set up to monitor grocery chain stores monopoly on the market.

“This study contains several interesting proposals with this in mind,” he continued.

In a commentary released in May, the International Law Office responded to minister Lysbakken’s claims and the public’s concerns about the lack of product diversity, explaining the reasons for such high grocery prices.

“It cannot be ruled out that high margins may have an impact on prices, the high prices must also be viewed in light of the diversity of the Norwegian geography, demography, import duties and agricultural policy.”



Published on Monday, 6th June, 2011 at 15:46 under the news category, by John Price   .

This post has the following tags: audunlysbakken, marineharvest, nortura, norwegianmeatprices.





  
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