Increased number of vipers in Norway / News / The Foreigner

Increased number of vipers in Norway. More people bitten in the last year than before. Norway’s only poisonous snake has become more numerous in the past few years. According to the Norwegian News Agency NTB, recent figures released by the Directorate of Health (Helsedirektoratet) show that the number of calls relating to snake bites rose to 175 last year. In 2007 it was 126, and in 2006, 107. Climate related Although research has not confirmed this to be the case Dag Dolmen, associate professor at the Science Museum in Trondheim, tells the Hitra-Frøya newspaper that there are more vipers in Norway than there were 20 years ago.

viper, snake, poisonous, norway, increase, symptoms



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Increased number of vipers in Norway

Published on Thursday, 21st May, 2009 at 23:14 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

More people bitten in the last year than before.

Viper
Viper
Photo: Zdenek Fric/Wikimedia Commons


Norway’s only poisonous snake has become more numerous in the past few years. According to the Norwegian News Agency NTB, recent figures released by the Directorate of Health (Helsedirektoratet) show that the number of calls relating to snake bites rose to 175 last year. In 2007 it was 126, and in 2006, 107.

Climate related

Although research has not confirmed this to be the case Dag Dolmen, associate professor at the Science Museum in Trondheim, tells the Hitra-Frøya newspaper that there are more vipers in Norway than there were 20 years ago.

“There are several signs that suggest the increase in numbers. Both a warmer climate and increased availability of small rodents has allowed the viper to give birth to more neonates. In addition, reports of sightings in places where they have not been spotted before suggest that their numbers are increasing at an even pace” he tells the paper.

Characteristic behaviour

The Norwegian Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet) say that the viper normally can be found in dense undergrowth, stone walls and rocky places, and seeks refuge should it be taken by surprise. But if trodden upon, or if it feels threatened, it will bite. The bite’s characteristic appearance is two small holes between three and nine millimetres apart.

Symptoms and advice

Being bitten by the viper is not fatal. Relatively mild symptoms include pain, swelling, and redness around the area of the bite. Serious ones can be swelling throughout the body, vomiting, nausea, stomach pains, palpitations, shock, dizziness, and unconsciousness.

Should you experience any of the above after having been bitten, then you are advised to go to hospital. The Institute also recommends that people should keep as still as possible, and not try to squeeze, cut, or suck out the poison from the affected area. You are advised to contact your doctor or, in serious cases, ring 113 to be connected to the ambulance service.

The viper is a protected species under Norwegian preservation laws.



Published on Thursday, 21st May, 2009 at 23:14 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: viper, snake, poisonous, norway, increase, symptoms.





  
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