Insomnia more prevalent amongst women / News / The Foreigner

Insomnia more prevalent amongst women. Large population-based study links demographic, physical and mental conditions. If you have ever had a bad night’s sleep, then you will know how much of an effect this can have on your performance the next day. You are not alone.A world-wide problem According to the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, almost everyone suffers from short-term insomnia, but approximately 40 million Americans develop chronic, long-term sleep disorders annually.

insomnia, women, old, bergen, study, awake, advice



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Insomnia more prevalent amongst women

Published on Tuesday, 4th August, 2009 at 21:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Large population-based study links demographic, physical and mental conditions.

A nice picture of an alarm clock
A nice picture of an alarm clock
Photo: Freerk Brouwer/Shutterstock Images


If you have ever had a bad night’s sleep, then you will know how much of an effect this can have on your performance the next day. You are not alone.

A world-wide problem

According to the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, almost everyone suffers from short-term insomnia, but approximately 40 million Americans develop chronic, long-term sleep disorders annually.

After having carried out a sleep study, researchers at the University of Bergen have published a report that lists both women and older adults as those who are more likely to suffer from insomnia.

Educational and lifestyle factors

The report’s author, Børge Sivertsen, tells vg.no that those who have only received their education from compulsory primary and secondary schools are twice as likely at risk of developing sleep disorders, compared to individuals with a university education. The probability of them receiving disability benefit increases by the same amount.

“It is connected to variables in their life-style. Those with a low education are typically less active, physically, and eat less healthily than those who have a high education,” he tells the paper.

47,700 individuals between the ages of 20 and 89 participated in the study, with insomnia being found in 13.5 percent of the population.

For a good night’s sleep, here is some advice from the American Institute’s web pages: 

·     Set a schedule. Go to bed at a set time each night and get up at the same time each morning. Disrupting this schedule may lead to insomnia. "Sleeping in" on weekends also makes it harder to wake up early on Monday morning because it re-sets your sleep cycles for a later awakening.

·     Exercise. Try to exercise 20 to 30 minutes a day. Daily exercise often helps people sleep, although a workout soon before bedtime may interfere with sleep. For maximum benefit, try to get your exercise about 5 to 6 hours before going to bed.

·     Avoid caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol. Avoid drinks that contain caffeine, which acts as a stimulant and keeps people awake. Sources of caffeine include coffee, chocolate, soft drinks, non-herbal teas, diet drugs, and some pain relievers. Smokers tend to sleep very lightly and often wake up in the early morning due to nicotine withdrawal. Alcohol robs people of deep sleep and REM sleep and keeps them in the lighter stages of sleep.

·     Relax before bed. A warm bath, reading, or another relaxing routine can make it easier to fall sleep. You can train yourself to associate certain restful activities with sleep and make them part of your bedtime ritual.

·     Sleep until sunlight. If possible, wake up with the sun, or use very bright lights in the morning. Sunlight helps the body's internal biological clock reset itself each day. Sleep experts recommend exposure to an hour of morning sunlight for people having problems falling asleep.

·     Don't lie in bed awake. If you can't get to sleep, don't just lie in bed. Do something else, like reading, watching television, or listening to music, until you feel tired. The anxiety of being unable to fall asleep can actually contribute to insomnia.

·     Control your room temperature. Maintain a comfortable temperature in the bedroom. Extreme temperatures may disrupt sleep or prevent you from falling asleep.

·     See a doctor if the sleeping problem continues. If you have trouble falling asleep night after night, or if you always feel tired the next day, then you may have a sleep disorder and should see a physician. Your primary care physician may be able to help you; if not, you can probably find a sleep specialist at a major hospital near you. Most sleep disorders can be treated effectively, so you can finally get that good night's sleep you need.




Published on Tuesday, 4th August, 2009 at 21:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: insomnia, women, old, bergen, study, awake, advice.





  
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