Institute of Public Health considers school closures / News / The Foreigner

Institute of Public Health considers school closures. Move aimed at curbing spread of virus. It seems that the Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet) is weighing up several options in their preparations for the arrival of the influenza A virus. Although they can’t predict how or where it will hit, the aim of possible school closures will be to contain its dispersal. At a press conference today, Hans Blystad, the Institute’s assistant director said that

influenza, a, h1n1, swine, flu, school, closures, institute, public, health, norwegian, authorities, folkehelseinstituttet



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Institute of Public Health considers school closures

Published on Monday, 10th August, 2009 at 22:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Move aimed at curbing spread of virus.

Fagerlund School (Illustration photo)
Fagerlund School (Illustration photo)
Photo: Anders Einar Hilden/Wikimedia Commons


Unclear

It seems that the Institute of Public Health (Folkehelseinstituttet) is weighing up several options in their preparations for the arrival of the influenza A virus. Although they can’t predict how or where it will hit, the aim of possible school closures will be to contain its dispersal.

At a press conference today, Hans Blystad, the Institute’s assistant director said that

“Society is now returning to more of a normal routine; something which could contribute to us seeing a noticeably higher infection rate over the course of the next few weeks.”

It’s now that people are returning from their summer holidays.

Protecting local inhabitants

Bjørn Guldvog, acting director of health, tells the Norwegian News Agency (NTB) that it’s not because the authorities wish to paint a gloomy picture, but the move is being considered in the interests of local school communities.

“We haven’t planned on closing schools, but if a very high majority of pupils at one school fall ill, there may not be any point in keeping tuition going. It could also be that we close schools in communities that have been hit very hard to avoid the chance of becoming infected,” he tells the agency.

Proceed as normal

Although the Institute wish to protect high-risk groups as far as possible until the vaccine arrives, they recommend everyone to start school and kindergarten as normal.

They do stress, however, that good practices for hand hygiene and when coughing be followed. Parents should keep their children at home for at least seven days if they fall ill. In addition, advice given to them by both their local health service and the national health authorities should be adhered to.

There have been 700 confirmed cases of influenza A registered to date, but the agency writes that authorities estimate that several thousand have been infected.



Published on Monday, 10th August, 2009 at 22:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: influenza, a, h1n1, swine, flu, school, closures, institute, public, health, norwegian, authorities, folkehelseinstituttet.





  
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