International Women’s Day / News / The Foreigner

International Women’s Day. It is 100 years today since the German feminist Clara Zetkin’s idea of International Women’s Day was born. Here’s a short round-up of some of today’s events and discussions. Audun Lysbakken, the Socialist Left’s (SV) Minister for Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion – who recently established a women’s panel – is attending events in both Oslo and Bergen. “Let 08 March be a celebration of the progress and goals we have achieved, whilst reminding each other about measures we must take to achieve full equality between women and men. We have come far in Norway and in part of the world, Nevertheless there is no world country that can claim to have reached full and real equality between the sexes,” he says in a press release.

clara, zetkin, internation, womensday, feminists, celebration, struggle, equality



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International Women’s Day

Published on Monday, 8th March, 2010 at 15:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

It is 100 years today since the German feminist Clara Zetkin’s idea of International Women’s Day was born. Here’s a short round-up of some of today’s events and discussions.

Bust of Clara Zetkin in Dresden
Bust of Clara Zetkin in Dresden
Photo: Daniel Weigelt/Wikimedia Commons


The politicians

Audun Lysbakken, the Socialist Left’s (SV) Minister for Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion – who recently established a women’s panel – is attending events in both Oslo and Bergen.

“Let 08 March be a celebration of the progress and goals we have achieved, whilst reminding each other about measures we must take to achieve full equality between women and men. We have come far in Norway and in part of the world, Nevertheless there is no world country that can claim to have reached full and real equality between the sexes,” he says in a press release.

Lysbakken has just returned from meetings with the UN Women’s Commission in New York, where delegates from 192 countries gathered to celebrate International Women’s Day in advance.

“Nearly finished” is the title of the Labour Party’s (Ap) marking of International Women’s Day.

“No, we aren’t nearly finished, though we have much to celebrate and be proud of. A greater degree of women take higher education, which is good, but receive less pay for the job they do, which isn’t. Though boards have a female representation of 40 percent, there are very few female top executives,” Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg tells Nettavisen at the opening.

The Lapps

The Norwegian Sami People are holding an open forum today to look at the some of the challenges facing Sami women and equality within their society.

“The Sami Parliament will be focusing particularly on women’s place in the Sami community. We mustn’t forget that 08 March is a day where women celebrate themselves,” council member Vibeke Larsen tells NRK.

Today’s appeals are to be held by Kirsti Bergstø og Ragnhild Dahlheim Eriksen, the women’s council’s leader, and deputy leader, respectively.

Sports

“Women are, quite simply, obstructed, and some try to keep them down in a sort of half-systematic way. They intimate they don’t believe in you, or won’t back you. If they had, female Norwegian athletes would have been even better, and even more visible on the international athletics scene,” says former long-distance runner Ingrid Kristiansen.

Kristiansen’s claims are supported by professor and sports sociologist Mari Kristin Sisjord, who says medical reasons are quite often used as supporting arguments.

“Women are too weak, and the female body shouldn’t be subjected to such high stress-levels. When it comes to ski-jumping, for example, it has been argued that impact could be harmful to the reproductive organs. That just isn’t so,” Sisjord says.

Lars Engebretsen, a doctor at the Norwegian Top Sport Programme (Olympiatoppen) says ice hockey, ski-jumping, and football are the top sports for the discrimination of women.

And Anette Sagen, who was due to open the new Holmenkollen ski jump last week – only to learn former Olympic Medalist Bjørn Einar Romørens had sailed off with the honour one day earlier – thinks equality has come far in Norway, but ski-jumping lags a long way behind.

“I don’t regard myself as being a symbol of women’s struggle, but I fight for what I believe in,” she says.

International Women’s Day was first celebrated in Norway in 1915.



Published on Monday, 8th March, 2010 at 15:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: clara, zetkin, internation, womensday, feminists, celebration, struggle, equality.





  
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