Interpol told Norway PST about Breivik / News / The Foreigner

Interpol told Norway PST about Breivik. Questions are being asked about Norwegian security officials’ apparent inaction following reports Interpol already warned them about Anders Behring Breivik. Following the World Customs Organization’s October seminar on terrorists’ illegal use of precursor chemicals, Norwegian customs authorities took part in “Project Global Shield”, a US Department of Homeland Security-initiated (DHS) global operation involving more than 70 countries, Interpol, and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC). The operation’s aim is to stop attackers getting ingredients for improvised explosive devices, or other potentially dangerous materials, including ammonium nitrate. This was one of the chemicals used by Timothy McVeigh in the 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing. The list also comprises hydrogen peroxide, one of the bomb ingredients for the attacks on London’s public transport system in 2005.

jannekristiansen, policesecurityservice, knutstorberget, andersbehringbreivik, projectglobalshield



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Interpol told Norway PST about Breivik

Published on Friday, 26th August, 2011 at 13:15 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 26th August 2011 at 15:02.

Questions are being asked about Norwegian security officials’ apparent inaction following reports Interpol already warned them about Anders Behring Breivik.

Police Security Service building (PST)
Police Security Service building (PST)
Photo: Hans-Petter Fjeld/Wikimedia Commons


International cooperation

Following the World Customs Organization’s October seminar on terrorists’ illegal use of precursor chemicals, Norwegian customs authorities took part in “Project Global Shield”, a US Department of Homeland Security-initiated (DHS) global operation involving more than 70 countries, Interpol, and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

The operation’s aim is to stop attackers getting ingredients for improvised explosive devices, or other potentially dangerous materials, including ammonium nitrate. This was one of the chemicals used by Timothy McVeigh in the 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing. The list also comprises hydrogen peroxide, one of the bomb ingredients for the attacks on London’s public transport system in 2005.

According to DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano, Project Global Shield authorities had seized over 33 metric tons of chemicals, mostly ammonium nitrate, 22 explosive precursors, and made 18 arrests by 23 June this year. Breivik’s manifesto lists several of these ingredients.

His personal diary also contains evidence he bought quantities of aluminium powder and sodium nitrate from a Polish dealer in December 2010 and had them posted to Norway. He used these chemicals as part of the homemade fertiliser bomb that killed government employees on July 22.

Norwegian Customs’ Geir Høiseth, confirms they warned the Police Security Service (PST) about the suspicious 120 kroner package.

“’Global Shield’ was the reason why Anders Behring Breivik’s name popped up, which led to him being reported to the PST,” he tells Bergens Tidende (BT).

Did nothing

Janne Kristiansen, head of the PST, stated to NRK earlier this year, “We were given a list with between 50 and 60 names by Interpol and Criminal Police (Kripos). Breivik’s name was on it because he paid 120 kroner to a company in Poland that came under the spotlight because it sold chemicals, amongst other things.”

Nevertheless, the PST did nothing more than confirm Breivik was not on its databases.

Defending her organisation’s actions last month, subsequently issuing an apology, she said to Dagbladet, “not even Stasi could have stopped him. Almost the entire population of Norway would have had to been registered on ours in order for him to be so. (...) The only way [to discover him] would have been a chip inside people's heads.”

Swedish terror expert Magnus Ranstrop is criticises the PST’s failure to act further, despite the fact 120 kroner is such a small sum.

“They should have called him in for an interview. It might have created some openings for a closer look at him. Checking 50-60 people would not have taken a lot of police’s time,” he says to BT.

Mr Ranstorp also argues police should have crosschecked the names against those with a gun license.

“Breivik would then have appeared as registered with semi-automatic weapons. Combining this information with the fact that he bought fertiliser could have meant he was discovered because his name would have stood out.”

Whilst Minister of Justice Knut Storberget refuses to comment on the matter, PST officials say they will now be following Right Extremists’ Internet use more closely in the aftermath of Breivik’s twin massacres.

“It’s an area where we see both increased activity and the importance of gathering information about what is happening on those sites. It’s a challenge. The Internet and social media are enormously diverse, in the number of opinions, their content, and websites,” Operational Manager Tore Risberget tells Aftenposten.



Published on Friday, 26th August, 2011 at 13:15 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 26th August 2011 at 15:02.

This post has the following tags: jannekristiansen, policesecurityservice, knutstorberget, andersbehringbreivik, projectglobalshield.





  
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