Italians beat Norwegians at own food game / News / The Foreigner

Italians beat Norwegians at own food game. Parma Ham and Parmesan producers have applied for patents in Norway to protect their goods against piracy. EU regulations, called “Geographical Indications and Designations of Origin”, make it illegal to label any foods or drinks by a trademarked name unless they contain the real ingredients. Outsiders Norway, with its agriculture industry not part of the EEA agreement, makes marketing ‘taste-a-likes’ exempt from European trademark laws, allowing producers to avoid the problem.

parmaham, prosciuttodiparma, parmesan, eupatentinglaws, norwegianfoodimitations



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Italians beat Norwegians at own food game

Published on Tuesday, 24th May, 2011 at 20:14 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Parma Ham and Parmesan producers have applied for patents in Norway to protect their goods against piracy.

Parma ham, parmesan, semi-dried tomato
Parma ham, parmesan, semi-dried tomato
Photo: Jon Olav Eikenes/Flickr


EU regulations, called “Geographical Indications and Designations of Origin”, make it illegal to label any foods or drinks by a trademarked name unless they contain the real ingredients.

Outsiders Norway, with its agriculture industry not part of the EEA agreement, makes marketing ‘taste-a-likes’ exempt from European trademark laws, allowing producers to avoid the problem.

In a historic move, Italian makers of Prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano Reggiano want to clamp down on ‘offenders’, and have applied to Norwegian patenting authorities for protection, reports Dagens Næringsliv (DN).

“Selling imitations using these Italian names on the Norwegian market will no longer be possible after this comes into force. The ban will also cover false branding in shops or on menus, unless the ingredients are authentic and you inform the customers of this,” says Nina W. Hegdahl, a lawyer at the Norwegian Agricultural Quality System and Food Branding Foundation.

Legal controller at Italian cured ham producers’ Conzorzio di Parma, Federico Disimoni, argues it is to protect both theirs’ and consumers’ interests. 500,000 sliced Parma Hams were sold in Norway last year.

“The Nordic Countries are apriorityfor us. However,there is no use building areputationwithoutfirst having protected the trademark. We are also very concernedthatconsumersare guaranteedthe right quality and not misled by imitations.”

Norwegian food producers also have to go through a similar procedure to protect their goods on the domestic market. None have applied for this in Europe, and Ms Hegdahl believes traditional scepticism is to blame.

“Norwegians are not used to thinking like this. As a rule, we have looked upon our nearest neighbour as being our biggest competitor. However, to build a brand requires producers who are willing to stand together in the same geographical area,” she tells DN.



Published on Tuesday, 24th May, 2011 at 20:14 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: parmaham, prosciuttodiparma, parmesan, eupatentinglaws, norwegianfoodimitations.





  
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