Jan Mayen criticism bounces off Norway Oil Minister / News / The Foreigner

Jan Mayen criticism bounces off Norway Oil Minister. Norway Petroleum and Energy Minister Ola Borten Moe has today spoken about the plans to look for oil off the island of Jan Mayen despite authorities strongly advising against the move. The Ministry has plans to explore for oil in a 100,000 square kilometre area off the island, with the Continental Shelf waters between Norway and Iceland being shared between both countries. Minister Borten Moe was on Iceland at the beginning of January and signed a historic deal for Norway to explore for oil on that side.

janmayenoil, oilexplorationnorway



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Jan Mayen criticism bounces off Norway Oil Minister

Published on Friday, 11th January, 2013 at 15:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 11th January 2013 at 16:05.

Norway Petroleum and Energy Minister Ola Borten Moe has today spoken about the plans to look for oil off the island of Jan Mayen despite authorities strongly advising against the move.

Jan Mayen coast
Jan Mayen coast
Photo: Hannes Grobe/Alfred Wegener Institute


The Ministry has plans to explore for oil in a 100,000 square kilometre area off the island, with the Continental Shelf waters between Norway and Iceland being shared between both countries.

Minister Borten Moe was on Iceland at the beginning of January and signed a historic deal for Norway to explore for oil on that side.

This follows a Norway-Iceland 1981 agreement. It allows Norway to invoke its right for a 25 percent participation share in a defined border area in the waters between both countries should Iceland initiate hydrocarbon activities

Icelandic authorities have already opened up parts of this area for seismic exploration, drilling and production.

In October 2012, the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy submitted an impact assessment for hearing. 15 January is the deadline that has been set.

At the same time, officials at both the Climate and Pollution Agency (Klif) and Directorate for Nature Management have said they are against the plans.

As well as the emergency preparedness challenges Jan Mayen brings because of its distance to the mainland and harsh conditions, a protection zone is in force covering nearly the entire island. 

Jan Mayen is a nature reserve and the waters around it contain vulnerable natural resources. WWF Norway advisor Nils Harley Boisen is concerned about the accident risk in connection with drilling for oil.

“The unique surrounding waters, vulnerable natural resources, long distance to the mainland, and a lack of "prudent preparedness against acute pollution" will also mean the consequences could be enormous when an accident happens,” he told Stavanger Aftenblad.

Talking to business daily Dagens Næringsliv (DN) today, Petroleum and Energy Minister Ola Borten said he intends to stick to the impact assessment and the government’s intention to explore for oil there. 

“Something entirely new we haven’t been previously aware of must come up in the consultation rounds for that not to happen.”




Published on Friday, 11th January, 2013 at 15:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 11th January 2013 at 16:05.

This post has the following tags: janmayenoil, oilexplorationnorway.





  
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