King's Bay tragedy tied to Cold War / News / The Foreigner

King's Bay tragedy tied to Cold War. A Norwegian author’s new book connects the King’s Bay mining accident with the Norway-Soviet Union relationship during the Cold War. The 1962 King’s Bay accident resulted in 21 deaths after a gas explosion 300 metres underground at the ‘Esther’ mine. Svalbard had seen mining accidents in 1948, 1952, and 1953. It is still unclear as to what caused the blast but the Cold War meant Ny-Ålesund mining operations continued far longer than advisable, reports NRK.

kingsbayminigaccident, einargerhardsenresignation



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King's Bay tragedy tied to Cold War

Published on Thursday, 1st November, 2012 at 17:17 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 2nd November 2012 at 08:54.

A Norwegian author’s new book connects the King’s Bay mining accident with the Norway-Soviet Union relationship during the Cold War.

King's Bay accident book cover
King's Bay accident book cover
Photo: Forlaget Press


The 1962 King’s Bay accident resulted in 21 deaths after a gas explosion 300 metres underground at the ‘Esther’ mine. Svalbard had seen mining accidents in 1948, 1952, and 1953.

It is still unclear as to what caused the blast but the Cold War meant Ny-Ålesund mining operations continued far longer than advisable, reports NRK.

Monica Kristensen writes in the publication, “There were almost daily problems of different natures at the bottom of the mine but only a few weeks to go before the coal was brought out and the section could be abandoned. [It was] a shame to leave so much good quality coal remaining in the mountains.”

Following a commission of inquiry, a report by Per Tønseth in 1963 revealed that there were several serious safety violations at the mine.

The then Prime Minister Einar Gerhardsen and his whole Cabinet resigned after a vote of no confidence.

Gerhardsen had travelled to Svalbard in 1955 to visit the mines in the area. In a speech in his own defence, he had said that, “nobody complained about safety conditions.”

“There’s little doubt the accident had enormous political consequences, Monica Kristensen told the broadcaster.

Forlaget Press published the book ‘Kings Bay-Saken’ (‘The King’s Bay Matter’).




Published on Thursday, 1st November, 2012 at 17:17 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 2nd November 2012 at 08:54.

This post has the following tags: kingsbayminigaccident, einargerhardsenresignation.





  
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