Large money find in Norway’s Nidaros Cathedral / News / The Foreigner

Large money find in Norway’s Nidaros Cathedral. Banknotes from the past valued at half a billion German reichsmarks were found inside Nidaros Cathedral’s Steinmeyer organ in Trondheim together with a letter. They were discovered in one of the organ’s windchests during restoration. “The letter and the money weren’t even discovered in 1962, when people from Steinmeyer were in Trondheim to move the organ from the north transept to the west transept,” Per Fridtjov Bonsaksen, organ expert and restoration project leader told Adressavisen, Friday. Switzerland’s Organ building company Orgelbau Kuhn, who found the “time capsule” while working on fully-restoring the Steinmeyer organ, sent Mr Bonsaksen the money.  

norwaymoney, germanyww1



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Large money find in Norway’s Nidaros Cathedral

Published on Friday, 27th September, 2013 at 14:42 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last Updated on 28th September 2013 at 20:23.

Banknotes from the past valued at half a billion German reichsmarks were found inside Nidaros Cathedral’s Steinmeyer organ in Trondheim together with a letter. They were discovered in one of the organ’s windchests during restoration.

A 1000-Reichsmark note from 1922
A 1000-Reichsmark note from 1922
Photo: Scanned by Golle95/Wikimedia Commons


“The letter and the money weren’t even discovered in 1962, when people from Steinmeyer were in Trondheim to move the organ from the north transept to the west transept,” Per Fridtjov Bonsaksen, organ expert and restoration project leader told Adressavisen, Friday.

Switzerland’s Organ building company Orgelbau Kuhn, who found the “time capsule” while working on fully-restoring the Steinmeyer organ, sent Mr Bonsaksen the money.  

An Organ builder from Öttingen named August Sieber placed the German relics dating from 8 January 1930 in the instrument. Sieber attached 12 banknotes to the letter that he had specifically addressed to the future. The lowest value was one reichsmark, the highest 500 million.

In it, Sieber delivers what Per Fridtjov Bonsaksen described as “a bitter and emotional greeting” from a time when Germany was still recovering from the damages of the First World War.

“The State itself also fell apart when Germany lost the 1914-18 War against the entire world, and everything was kaput and bankrupt. People also had no money then, either.”

Germany’s government had intervened in 1923 to stop the hyperinflation affecting the country, making the notes worthless. According to Adressavisen, Sieber expected this would change following the Wall Street Crash of 1929.

“Enough money will come with inflation, as you’ll see.”



Published on Friday, 27th September, 2013 at 14:42 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last updated on 28th September 2013 at 20:23.

This post has the following tags: norwaymoney, germanyww1.





  
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