Leading companies in Crown Estate licence bid / News / The Foreigner

Leading companies in Crown Estate licence bid. Round three for UK offshore wind farms will see a consortium of four international energy companies bidding to win exclusive rights under the terms of the Zone Development Agreements. According to Statkraft, the bid concerns areas that the British government hopes will give 25,000 Megawatts of renewable energy.Anglo-Norwegian cooperation Britain is well under way with building the biggest offshore wind-power development that the world has ever seen, whilst Norway is dawdling.

british, statoilhydro, forewind, norway



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Leading companies in Crown Estate licence bid

Published on Friday, 27th February, 2009 at 06:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Round three for UK offshore wind farms will see a consortium of four international energy companies bidding to win exclusive rights under the terms of the Zone Development Agreements.

Hywind test-mill
Hywind test-mill
Photo: Illustration/StatoilHydro


What it’s about

According to Statkraft, the bid concerns areas that the British government hopes will give 25,000 Megawatts of renewable energy.

Anglo-Norwegian cooperation

Britain is well under way with building the biggest offshore wind-power development that the world has ever seen, whilst Norway is dawdling.

According to Stavanger Aftenblad, Gunnar Kvassheim, the leader of the Norwegian Parliament’s Energy and Environment Committee, thinks that it’s sad that Norway is so far behind when it involves adjusting to a project with an operational commitment such as this.

The consortium is called “Forewind”, and, according to Project Manager Peter Rafferty, it

“draws on exceptional organisational resources, financial strength, technical knowledge and a proven track-record of offshore project delivery which, when combined, prepare it well for the extraordinary challenges facing Round 3 developers.”

The players

Airtricity, who’s parent company is Scottish and Southern Enery PLC, RWE npower renewables – the UK subsidiary of RWE Innology, Statkraft, and StatoilHydro. Each company will have a 25 percent stake in the project.

Content committee

In a statement, Kvassheim, says that

“this is both major and marvellous news. In a week where StatoilHydro’s future role has been discussed, it’s positive to see the company moving in the direction of becoming a wider type of energy company.”

The application has to be delivered by 03 March 2009, and it is expected that the allocation of zones will already start at the end of the year. Construction can begin at the earliest in 2015.



Published on Friday, 27th February, 2009 at 06:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: british, statoilhydro, forewind, norway.





  
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