Letter to the Editor: A Message to Statoil Shareholders / News / The Foreigner

Letter to the Editor: A Message to Statoil Shareholders. 'Statoil shareholders should be made aware of venture liabilities within Arctic Alaskan operations their corporation is now considering,' a The Foreigner reader writes. Daniel J. Inulak Lum lives in Barrow, Alaska. He is a descendant of the Iñupiat Eskimos and studies the Iñupiat language.

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Letter to the Editor: A Message to Statoil Shareholders

Published on Tuesday, 14th May, 2013 at 12:24 under the news category, by Daniel J. Inulak Lum.
Last Updated on 15th May 2013 at 21:14.

'Statoil shareholders should be made aware of venture liabilities within Arctic Alaskan operations their corporation is now considering,' a The Foreigner reader writes.

Polar bear standing on the rocks
Polar bear standing on the rocks
Photo: Kaefer Photo/Shutterstock Images


“As they meander through the Environmental Impact Review process, Statoil is positioning itself to be possibly the lone operator in a remote and unforgiving seascape. Royal Dutch Shell and Conoco Phillips have both recently cancelled Arctic Ocean operations for 2014, after Shell’s 2012 offshore season was plagued by operating mishaps and Coast Guard violations. Neither company is anywhere close to ready to operate so far out in the Chukchi Sea theatre – a reality check to all of industry.

Remote ice fields and torrential Arctic storms threaten any rigs so far out in the Chukchi Sea. Some offshore rigs operate in Arctic Alaska, but they are close to shore and protected by barrier islands, not 70-90 miles out in the ocean where the lease sites are. Large sheets of ice, broken ice fields and hurricane level winds occur out there. It is not a safe place to operate and an even worse place to try to contain an oil spill," the letter from Daniel J. Inulak Lum reads.

"There is new scientific information about subsurface ocean currents in the Chukchi Sea that would bring any oil spills straight to shore from Chukchi Sea drilling sites, spreading up and down the coast of the entire North Slope of Alaska, crossing through whale, seal, walrus and bird migration corridors. The Divergent Current flows directly from the Chukchi Sea offshore drilling sites to the village of Wainwright, and then splits in both directions down the coast. In the case of a large oil spill from the drill site, this current would ensure that our shores across the North Slope of Alaska - in both directions- would be immersed in crude.

This current intersects the Bowhead Whale migration route. This is the most important animal to the coastal Inupiat Eskimo, providing huge amounts of meat and blubber to sustain through the winters. This intersection can be seen when you compare the migration route map and the Chukchi Sea current maps. Essentially we stand to lose the whales that we eat, and you stand to lose billions and billions in clean-up costs," states Mr Lum

"Just as BP has lost billions of dollars to the Deep Water Horizon incident, Statoil is poised to possibly do the same, except in the Arctic. The huge ice packs, the strong wind and waves, and the complete lack of oil spill response threaten your company’s rigs.

Shareholders - urge your corporation to remove themselves from the Arctic Ocean and from the physical and financial peril accompanying it. The high Arctic is different than anywhere else Statoil has operated. The liabilities are clear, and any progression forward on the Arctic Ocean is a complete gamble with Statoil’s profitability and the value of your stock,” Mr Lum concludes.

Daniel J. Inulak Lum lives in Barrow, Alaska. He is a descendant of the Iñupiat Eskimos and studies the Iñupiat language.




Published on Tuesday, 14th May, 2013 at 12:24 under the news category, by Daniel J. Inulak Lum.
Last updated on 15th May 2013 at 21:14.

This post has the following tags: arcticoil, oilalaska, statoilalaska.





  
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