Letting the music and art schools call the tune / News / The Foreigner

Letting the music and art schools call the tune. Principal and minister sing from the same hymn sheet. Perfecting and art takes time and practice. The shorter the lesson time, the less time those who are neither gifted nor keen will practice on honing it; the shorter the time, the less motivated they stay. To prevent the arts dying requires funds.Time is money Trond Giske, the minister of culture, sees the need to give the Norwegian council-run music and art school system a boost. He is not alone.

trond, giske, culture, minister, music, arts, sola, queues, funding, state, council, price-cap, business



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Letting the music and art schools call the tune

Published on Monday, 27th July, 2009 at 23:54 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Principal and minister sing from the same hymn sheet.

Old sheet music
Old sheet music
Photo: Charles Taylor/Shutterstock Images


Perfecting and art takes time and practice. The shorter the lesson time, the less time those who are neither gifted nor keen will practice on honing it; the shorter the time, the less motivated they stay. To prevent the arts dying requires funds.

Time is money

Trond Giske, the minister of culture, sees the need to give the Norwegian council-run music and art school system a boost. He is not alone.

“The state must provide finances to give the impetus for both more school-places and buildings,” Trygve Bjerkreim, Sola music and art school’s principle tells Stavanger Aftenblad.

The waiting-list is long. Only half who applied to get in were offered a place last year.

Bringing the colour back

Every year, the state gives funds to the councils, but it is up to them to decide how to allocate them. Funds for the music and arts schools used to be earmarked.

But when both the subsidies and the price-cap for a place were lifted during the last parliamentary term, it turned them in to just a task for the council to run. Giske believes this is responsible for there being too large a difference in coverage and price between the various schools

Sola labour party’s group leader, Siv-Len Strandskog, would like to see a return to the old system, and says that they are working on it.

“You cannot remove subsidies and price-caps before you know there is secure provision for everybody, and that they have a legal right to go (there),” she says.

Waiting is an art.



Published on Monday, 27th July, 2009 at 23:54 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: trond, giske, culture, minister, music, arts, sola, queues, funding, state, council, price-cap, business.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!