Libya tries to hold Statoil to ransom / News / The Foreigner

Libya tries to hold Statoil to ransom. The Libyan government says Statoil could lose future lucrative contracts in the country if production is not resumed immediately. Statoil earned half a billion kroner last year due to its co-partnerships with Total and Repsol in two separate oil fields in the country, according to Dagens Næringsliv (DN). The worsening situation forced Statoil to close its Tripoli office last month and evacuate its international staff. Its 30 local personnel were instructed to stay away from work and were paid their salaries in advance.

jannicklindbaekk, statoil, libya, tripoli, muammaral-gaddafi, shokrighanem, nationaloilcorporation



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Libya tries to hold Statoil to ransom

Published on Monday, 21st March, 2011 at 13:56 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Libyan government says Statoil could lose future lucrative contracts in the country if production is not resumed immediately.

New Identity, Statoil
New Identity, Statoil
Photo: Øyvind Hagen/Statoil


Statoil earned half a billion kroner last year due to its co-partnerships with Total and Repsol in two separate oil fields in the country, according to Dagens Næringsliv (DN).

The worsening situation forced Statoil to close its Tripoli office last month and evacuate its international staff. Its 30 local personnel were instructed to stay away from work and were paid their salaries in advance.

“Our focus is for the safety of our people in Libya, and we don’t want to comment about the political situation at the moment,” Jannick Lindbækk, Head of Statoil’s media relations and spokesperson for corporate affairs, tells The Foreigner.

The company’s decision has clearly angered Libyan officials, who are now threatening to consider other measures if Statoil does not return and restart production right away.

“Whilst it is not our intention to break existing agreements with western companies, we will consider giving other contracts that are not out for tender to new operators who are willing to come here and work. We wish to increase our oil production,” Shokri Ghanem, Chairman of the country’s state-run National Oil Corporation, said at last weekend’s press conference in Tripoli.

DN reports Muammar al-Gaddafi has told an Italian newspaper he would like to invite the Russians, Chinese, and Indians.

Nevertheless, Jannick Lindbækk tells The Foreigner Statoil has no plans of returning for now.

“We are waiting to see how it develops and will follow Norwegian foreign policy, and abide by any international sanctions.”



Published on Monday, 21st March, 2011 at 13:56 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: jannicklindbaekk, statoil, libya, tripoli, muammaral-gaddafi, shokrighanem, nationaloilcorporation.





  
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