Literature prize bypasses Norwegians / News / The Foreigner

Literature prize bypasses Norwegians. Pipped to the post by a Finn. This year’s Nordic Literature Council’s Prize has been awarded to the Finnish author Sofi Oksanen for her novel “Puhdistus” (“Cleansing”).“Timeless” The story deals with the Soviet occupation of Estonia, referring to one of the contemporary burning global themes  – trafficking around the Baltic Sea – and is Oksanen’s third novel.

sofi, oksanen, finland, literature, prize, nordic, council, karl, ove, knausgaard, tomas, espedal



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Literature prize bypasses Norwegians

Published on Tuesday, 30th March, 2010 at 14:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Pipped to the post by a Finn.

Sofi Oksanen
Sofi Oksanen
Photo: Teemu Rajala/Wikimedia Commons


This year’s Nordic Literature Council’s Prize has been awarded to the Finnish author Sofi Oksanen for her novel “Puhdistus” (“Cleansing”).

“Timeless”

The story deals with the Soviet occupation of Estonia, referring to one of the contemporary burning global themes  – trafficking around the Baltic Sea – and is Oksanen’s third novel.

"Sofi Oksanen's novel 'Puhdistus' ('Cleansing') takes place in two periods of time in Estonia, but its themes of love, treachery, power and powerlessness are timeless. 'Puhdistus' vibrates with tension: unspoken secrets and deeply shameful deeds stretch out across the book like a web and compel the reader to keep reading. With a rare precise and apposite language Oksanen describes what history does to individuals and history's pervasion in the present," the Adjudication Committee writes in a press release.

“Powerful”

Oksanen made a guest appearance at Literaturhuset in Oslo on 10 February this year in connection with the launch of her novel’s publication in Norwegian.

“It’s no surprise that Sofi Oksanen has won the prize. She has been a favorite in many countries, and it is well deserved. She’s written an incredibly powerful and unique book that certainly deserves an award, "says NRK's literature reviewer Marta Norheim.

Norway’s Karl Ove Knausgård from Sørlandet, with his novel “Min kamp 1” (“My Battle 1”), was tipped as being a favourite to win this year’s prize, but was defeated by the Finn. Tomas Espedal’s novel “Imot kunsten” (“Against Art”) was also nominated.

“Nervous”

“I was obviously very surprised. This is the second time the award goes to a Finnish female writer. I was a little nervous earlier, as several journalists contacted me already on Monday and asked me for a winner’s interview,” the author tells svd.se.

Oksanen, was born in 1997, and grew up in Jyväskylä. She will collect the prize of 350,000 Danish kroner (approximately 380,000 Norwegian kroner) at the beginning of November this year during the Nordic Council’s 62nd session in Reykjavik.

The book has been sold in more than 25 countries.



Published on Tuesday, 30th March, 2010 at 14:44 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: sofi, oksanen, finland, literature, prize, nordic, council, karl, ove, knausgaard, tomas, espedal.





  
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